Article

Inequality, race, and mortality in U.S. cities: A political and econometric review of Deaton and Lubotsky (56:6, 1139–1153, 2003)

Department of Economics and CPPA, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
Social Science [?] Medicine (Impact Factor: 2.56). 04/2009; 68(11):1909-13. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2009.02.038
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Our replication of Deaton and Lubotsky's [(2003). Mortality, inequality and race in American cities and states. Social Science & Medicine, 56.] study "Mortality, Inequality and Race in American Cities and States" identifies a coding error in the econometric analysis in the original paper. Correcting the error changes the basic results of the paper with respect to inequality and mortality in a relevant and substantive way. We also propose an alternative interpretation of the other main result of the paper regarding racial composition and mortality.

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