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Commentary on "a roadmap for the prevention of dementia II: Leon Thal Symposium 2008." Prevention trials in persons at risk for dominantly inherited Alzheimer's disease: opportunities and challenges.

Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer's Disease Research, UCLA Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association (Impact Factor: 17.47). 04/2009; 5(2):166-71. DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2008.12.002
Source: PubMed
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