Congenital muscular dystrophies with defective glycosylation of dystroglycan: A population study

Department of Child Neurology, Policlinico Gemelli, Largo Gemelli, 00168 Rome, Italy.
Neurology (Impact Factor: 8.29). 04/2009; 72(21):1802-9. DOI: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000346518.68110.60
Source: PubMed


Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with mutations in six genes encoding proven or putative glycosyltransferases.
The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of mutations in the six genes in the Italian population and the spectrum of clinical and brain MRI findings.
As part of a multicentric study involving all the tertiary neuromuscular centers in Italy, FKRP, POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, fukutin, and LARGE were screened in 81 patients with CMD and alpha-DG reduction on muscle biopsy (n = 76) or with a phenotype suggestive of alpha-dystroglycanopathy but in whom a muscle biopsy was not available for alpha-DG immunostaining (n = 5).
Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations were detected in a total of 43/81 patients (53%), and included seven novel variants. Mutations in POMT1 were the most prevalent in our cohort (21%), followed by POMT2 (11%), POMGnT1 (10%), and FKRP (9%). One patient carried two heterozygous mutations in fukutin and one case harbored a new homozygous variant in LARGE. No clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlation could be observed with each gene, resulting in a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. The more severe phenotypes, however, appeared to be consistently associated with mutations predicted to result in a severe disruption of the respective genes.
Our data broaden the clinical spectrum associated with mutations in glycosyltransferases and provide data on their prevalence in the Italian population.

14 Reads
  • Source
    • "Mutations allowing a residual enzyme activity are linked to mild forms. Different POMT1 alleles, cause congenital muscular dystrophies due to defects of the dystroglycan glycosylation (MDDGC1) and including severe forms with brain and eye anomalies or mental retardation (56-58). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a highly heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, which first affect the voluntary muscles of the hip and shoulder areas. The definition is highly descriptive and less ambiguous by exclusion: non-Xlinked, non-FSH, non-myotonic, non-distal, nonsyndromic, and non-congenital. At present, the genetic classification is becoming too complex, since the acronym LGMD has also been used for a number of other myopathic disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Today, the list of genes to be screened is too large for the gene-by-gene approach and it is well suited for targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) panels that should include any gene that has been so far associated with a clinical picture of LGMD. The present review has the aim of recapitulating the genetic basis of LGMD ordering and of proposing a nomenclature for the orphan forms. This is useful given the pace of new discoveries. Thity-one loci have been identified so far, eight autosomal dominant and 23 autosomal recessive. The dominant forms (LGMD1) are: LGMD1A (myotilin), LGMD1B (lamin A/C), LGMD1C (caveolin 3), LGMD1D (DNAJB6), LGMD1E (desmin), LGMD1F (transportin 3), LGMD1G (HNRPDL), LGMD1H (chr. 3). The autosomal recessive forms (LGMD2) are: LGMD2A (calpain 3), LGMD2B (dysferlin), LGMD2C (γ sarcoglycan), LGMD2D (α sarcoglycan), LGMD2E (β sarcoglycan), LGMD2F (δ sarcoglycan), LGMD2G (telethonin), LGMD2H (TRIM32), LGMD2I (FKRP), LGMD2J (titin), LGMD2K (POMT1), LGMD2L (anoctamin 5), LGMD2M (fukutin), LGMD2N (POMT2), LGMD2O (POMTnG1), LGMD2P (dystroglycan), LGMD2Q (plectin), LGMD2R (desmin), LGMD2S (TRAPPC11), LGMD2T (GMPPB), LGMD2U (ISPD), LGMD2V (Glucosidase, alpha ), LGMD2W (PINCH2).
    Acta myologica: myopathies and cardiomyopathies: official journal of the Mediterranean Society of Myology / edited by the Gaetano Conte Academy for the study of striated muscle diseases 05/2014; 33(1):1-12.
  • Source
    • "While point mutations are the most common mutation type in all genes, genomic deletions or deletion-insertions have been reported in POMT2 and LARGE in particular [49] [53] [54]. Mutations in POMGnT1 showed the highest correlation with the typical MEB phenotype [38] [55]. Patients homozygous for the ancestral Japanese mutation (insertion of a retrotransposon) in FKTN have a comparatively milder phenotype (FCMD), while the disease severity increases towards the MEB and WWS range in patients who are compound heterozygous for this ancestral mutation and a more severe loss-of-function mutation on the other allele [56]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are early onset disorders of muscle with histological features suggesting a dystrophic process. The congenital muscular dystrophies as a group encompass great clinical as well genetic heterogeneity so that achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis has become increasingly challenging, even in the age of next generation sequencing. In this document we review the diagnostic features, differential diagnostic considerations and available diagnostic tools for the various CMD subtypes and provide a systematic guide to the use of these resources for achieving an accurate molecular diagnosis. An International Committee on the Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies composed of experts on various aspects relevant to the CMDs performed a review of the available literature as well as of the unpublished expertise represented by the members of the committee and their contacts. This process was refined by two rounds of online surveys and followed by a three-day meeting at which the conclusions were presented and further refined. The combined consensus summarized in this document allows the physician to recognize the presence of a CMD in a child with weakness based on history, clinical examination, muscle biopsy results, and imaging. It will be helpful in suspecting a specific CMD subtype in order to prioritize testing to arrive at a final genetic diagnosis.
    Neuromuscular Disorders 01/2014; · 2.64 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "Alpha-dystroglycanopathy is a group of muscular dystrophies caused by altered glycosylation of a-dystroglycan (a-DG), which is one of the components of dystrophin–glycoprotein complex [1] [2]. The clinical phenotypes form a broad spectrum, ranging from severe congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) with or without ocular and central nervous system involvement to later-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) [3] [4] [5]. A number of genes have been reported to cause a-dystroglycanopathy, including POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, FKTN, FKRP, and LARGE that are known to be involved in glycosylation of a-DG, and DAG1, which encodes DG itself [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alpha-dystroglycanopathy is caused by the glycosylation defects of α-dystroglycan (α-DG). The clinical spectrum ranges from severe congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) to later-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Among all α-dystroglycanopathies, LGMD type 2I caused by FKRP mutations is most commonly seen in Europe but appears to be rare in Asia. We screened uncategorized 40 LGMD and 10 CMD patients by immunohistochemistry for α-DG and found 7 with reduced α-DG immunostaining. Immunoblotting with laminin overlay assay confirmed the impaired glycosylation of α-DG. Among them, five LGMD patients harbored FKRP mutations leading to the diagnosis of LGMD2I. One common mutation, c.948delC, was identified and cardiomyopathy was found to be very common in our cohort. Muscle images showed severe involvement of gluteal muscles and posterior compartment at both thigh and calf levels, which is helpful for the differential diagnosis. Due to the higher frequency of LGMD2I with cardiomyopathy in our series, the early introduction of mutation analysis of FKRP in undiagnosed Taiwanese LGMD patients is highly recommended.
    Neuromuscular Disorders 06/2013; 23(8). DOI:10.1016/j.nmd.2013.05.010 · 2.64 Impact Factor
Show more