Article

Preexposure Antiretroviral Prophylaxis Attitudes in High-Risk Boston Area Men Who Report Having Sex With Men: Limited Knowledge and Experience but Potential for Increased Utilization After Education

The Fenway Institute, Fenway Community Health, Boston, MA 02119, USA.
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (Impact Factor: 4.39). 02/2009; 50(1):77-83. DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31818d5a27
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could protect individuals engaging in repeated high-risk behaviors from HIV infection. Understanding the demographic and behavioral predictors of intent-to-use PrEP may prove useful to identify clinical trial participants.
In 2007, 227 HIV-uninfected men who report having sex with men (MSM) recruited through modified respondent-driven sampling completed an interviewer-administered survey assessing prior PrEP use and awareness, future intent-to-use PrEP, demographics, sexual risk, psychosocial variables, and drug/alcohol use. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined predictors of intent-to-use PrEP.
Mean age of participants was 41 (SD = 9.1); 54% were nonwhite. One participant reported prior off-label PrEP use (medication obtained from his HIV-infected brother). Nineteen percent had previously heard of PrEP, whereas 74% reported intent-to-use PrEP if available after being educated about its potential. In multivariable analysis controlling for age and race/ethnicity, significant predictors of intent-to-use PrEP included the following: less education [odds ratio (OR) = 7.7; P = 0.04], moderate income (OR = 13.0; P = 0.04), no perceived side effects from taking PrEP (OR = 3.5; P = 0.001), and not having to pay for PrEP (OR = 4.2; P = 0.05).
Many New England MSM indicated an interest in using PrEP after learning about its potential, particularly if they could obtain PrEP at no expense and if PrEP had no side effects. Less educated MSM and those who knew less about PrEP and antiretroviral therapy before entering the study were more open to using antiretroviral therapy for prevention once they had received some information suggesting its potential value. Findings suggest that careful educational messages are necessary to ensure appropriate PrEP use if clinical trials reveal partial efficacy.

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