Article

Association of sleep duration with mortality from cardiovascular disease and other causes for Japanese men and women: the JACC study.

Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
Sleep (Impact Factor: 5.06). 04/2009; 32(3):295-301.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To examine sex-specific associations between sleep duration and mortality from cardiovascular disease and other causes.
Cohort study.
Community-based study.
A total of 98,634 subjects (41,489 men and 57,145 women) aged 40 to 79 years from 1988 to 1990 and were followed until 2003.
N/A.
During a median follow-up of 14.3 years, there were 1964 deaths (men and women: 1038 and 926) from stroke, 881 (508 and 373) from coronary heart disease, 4287 (2297 and 1990) from cardiovascular disease, 5465 (3432 and 2033) from cancer, and 14,540 (8548 and 5992) from all causes. Compared with a sleep duration of 7 hours, sleep duration of 4 hours or less was associated with increased mortality from coronary heart disease for women and noncardiovascular disease/noncancer and all causes in both sexes. The respective multivariable hazard ratios were 2.32 (1.19-4.50) for coronary heart disease in women, 1.49 (1.02-2.18) and 1.47 (1.01-2.15) for noncardiovascular disease/noncancer, and 1.29 (1.02-1.64) and 1.28 (1.03-1.60) for all causes in men and women, respectively. Long sleep duration of 10 hours or longer was associated with 1.5- to 2-fold increased mortality from total and ischemic stroke, total cardiovascular disease, noncardiovascular disease/noncancer, and all causes for men and women, compared with 7 hours of sleep in both sexes. There was no association between sleep duration and cancer mortality in either sex.
Both short and long sleep duration were associated with increased mortality from cardiovascular disease, noncardiovascular disease/noncancer, and all causes for both sexes, yielding a U-shaped relationship with total mortality with a nadir at 7 hours of sleep.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
97 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of sleep duration and all-cause mortality among 2,449 Polish community-dwelling older citizens of Krakow observed during 22 years of follow-up. In particular, the role of some demographic, psychosocial and health-related conditions were investigated in terms of modification effect. In the prospective study, background information was gathered by face-to-face interview. Vital data were obtained from the population registry. Cox regression models were used to assess the role of sleep duration in mortality, in the analyses of potential effect modifiers and the shape of the relationship. Sleep duration was observed to be a significant predictor of all-cause mortality. Life-weariness, functional activity, total number of chronic diseases and age (65–79, 80+) were found to be effect modifiers for the relationship between sleep duration and mortality. Further investigation showed a U-shaped mortality risk associated with the duration of sleep among individuals with a high level of life-weariness, high functional activity and in individuals aged 80 and over. On the other hand, a linear relationship between longer sleep duration and mortality was observed among older people with no experience of life-weariness, without chronic diseases, with medium functional activity and aged 65–79, but also among those who reported three and more chronic conditions. Results of our study support available evidence showing the relationship between sleep duration and mortality among older adults and suggest that any public health intervention in this area should consider also other coexisting modifiable psychosocial and functional determinants.
    European Journal of Ageing 01/2014; · 1.27 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A significant U-shaped association between sleep duration and several morbidity (obesity, diabetes or cardiovascular disease) and mortality risks has been regularly reported. However, although the physiological pathways and risks associated with "too short sleep" (<5 hours/day) have been well demonstrated, little is known about "too much sleeping".
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e106950. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: A significant U-shaped association between sleep duration and several morbidity (obesity, diabetes or cardiovascular disease) and mortality risks has been regularly reported. However, although the physiological pathways and risks associated with ‘‘too short sleep’’ (,5 hours/day) have been well demonstrated, little is known about ‘‘too much sleeping’’. Purpose: To explore socio-demographic characteristics and comorbidities of ‘‘long sleepers’’ (over 10 hours/day) from a nationally representative sample of adults. Methods: A cross-sectional nationally representative sample of 24,671 subjects from 15 to 85-year-old. An estimated total sleep time (TST) on non-leisure days was calculated based on a specifically designed sleep log which allows to distinguish ‘‘long sleepers’’ from ‘‘short sleepers’’ (,5 hours/day). Insomnia was assessed according to the International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD-2). Results: The average TST was 7 hours and 13 minutes (+/2 17 minutes). Six hundred and twelve subjects were ‘‘long sleepers’’ (2.7%) and 1969 ‘‘short sleepers’’ (7.5%). Compared to the whole group, ‘‘long sleepers’’ were more often female, younger (15–25 year-old) or older (above 65 year-old), with no academic degree, mostly clerks and blue collar workers. ‘‘Long sleepers’’ were significantly more likely to have psychiatric diseases and a greater body mass index (BMI). However, long sleep was not significantly associated with the presence of any other chronic medical disease assessed. Conversely, short sleep duration was significantly associated with almost all the other chronic diseases assessed. Conclusions: In the general population, sleeping too much was associated with psychiatric diseases and higher BMI, but not with other chronic medical diseases
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 16(9):e106950. · 3.53 Impact Factor

Preview

Download
0 Downloads
Available from