Article

Impairments in endocannabinoid signaling and depressive illness.

Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10021, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 04/2009; 301(11):1165-6. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2009.369
Source: PubMed
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