Article

Structural basis for high-affinity peptide inhibition of p53 interactions with MDM2 and MDMX.

Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 04/2009; 106(12):4665-70. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0900947106
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The oncoproteins MDM2 and MDMX negatively regulate the activity and stability of the tumor suppressor protein p53--a cellular process initiated by MDM2 and/or MDMX binding to the N-terminal transactivation domain of p53. MDM2 and MDMX in many tumors confer p53 inactivation and tumor survival, and are important molecular targets for anticancer therapy. We screened a duodecimal peptide phage library against site-specifically biotinylated p53-binding domains of human MDM2 and MDMX chemically synthesized via native chemical ligation, and identified several peptide inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions. The most potent inhibitor (TSFAEYWNLLSP), termed PMI, bound to MDM2 and MDMX at low nanomolar affinities--approximately 2 orders of magnitude stronger than the wild-type p53 peptide of the same length (ETFSDLWKLLPE). We solved the crystal structures of synthetic MDM2 and MDMX, both in complex with PMI, at 1.6 A resolution. Comparative structural analysis identified an extensive, tightened intramolecular H-bonding network in bound PMI that contributed to its conformational stability, thus enhanced binding to the 2 oncogenic proteins. Importantly, the C-terminal residue Pro of PMI induced formation of a hydrophobic cleft in MDMX previously unseen in the structures of p53-bound MDM2 or MDMX. Our findings deciphered the structural basis for high-affinity peptide inhibition of p53 interactions with MDM2 and MDMX, shedding new light on structure-based rational design of different classes of p53 activators for potential therapeutic use.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
164 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Proteins composed entirely of unnatural d-amino acids and the achiral amino acid glycine are mirror image forms of their native l-protein counterparts. Recent advances in chemical protein synthesis afford unique and facile synthetic access to domain-sized mirror image d-proteins, enabling protein research to be conducted through ‘the looking glass’ and in a way previously unattainable. d-Proteins can facilitate structure determination of their native l-forms that are difficult to crystallize (racemic X-ray crystallography); d-proteins can serve as the bait for library screening to ultimately yield pharmacologically superior d-peptide/d-protein therapeutics (mirror-image phage display); d-proteins can also be used as a powerful mechanistic tool for probing molecular events in biology. This review examines recent progress in the application of mirror image proteins to structural biology, drug discovery, and immunology.
    Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 10/2014; 22:56–61. · 7.65 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Most inhibitors of Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) target its ATP-binding pocket. It is difficult, however, to use this pocket to design very specific inhibitors because this catalytic pocket is highly conserved in the protein family of CDKs. Here we report some short peptides targeting a noncatalytic pocket near the interface of the CDK2/Cyclin complex. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to select the peptides, and detailed dynamical network analysis revealed that these peptides weaken the complex formation via allosteric interactions. Our experiments showed that upon binding to the noncatalytic pocket, these peptides break the CDK2/Cyclin complex partially and diminish its kinase activity in vitro. The binding affinity of these peptides measured by Surface Plasmon Resonance can reach as low as 0.5 µM.
    PLoS ONE 10/2014; 9(10):e109154. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play central roles in orchestrating biological processes. While some PPIs are stable, many important ones are transient and hard to detect with conventional approaches. We developed ReBiL, a recombinase enhanced bimolecular luciferase complementation platform, to enable detection of weak PPIs in living cells. ReBiL readily identified challenging transient interactions between an E3 ubiquitin ligase and an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. ReBiL's ability to rapidly interrogate PPIs in diverse conditions revealed that some stapled α-helical peptides, a class of PPI antagonists, induce target-independent cytosolic leakage and cytotoxicity that is antagonized by serum. These results explain the requirement for serum-free conditions to detect stapled peptide activity, and define a required parameter to evaluate for peptide antagonist approaches. ReBiL's ability to expedite PPI analysis, assess target specificity and cell permeability, and reveal off-target effects of PPI modifiers should facilitate the development of effective, cell-permeable PPI therapeutics and the elaboration of diverse biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Cell reports. 11/2014;

Full-text

Download
52 Downloads
Available from
Jun 2, 2014