Age and Sex Patterns of Drug Prescribing in a Defined American Population

Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
Mayo Clinic Proceedings (Impact Factor: 6.26). 06/2013; 88(7). DOI: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.04.021
Source: PubMed


To describe the age and sex patterns of drug prescribing in Olmsted County, Minnesota.
Population-based drug prescription records for the Olmsted County population in 2009 were obtained using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system (n=142,377). Drug prescriptions were classified using RxNorm codes and were grouped using the National Drug File-Reference Terminology.
Overall, 68.1% of the population (n=96,953) received a prescription from at least 1 drug group, 51.6% (n=73,501) received prescriptions from 2 or more groups, and 21.2% (n=30,218) received prescriptions from 5 or more groups. The most commonly prescribed drug groups in the entire population were penicillins and β-lactam antimicrobials (17%; n=23,734), antidepressants (13%; n=18,028), opioid analgesics (12%; n=16,954), antilipemic agents (11%; n=16,082), and vaccines/toxoids (11%; n=15,918). However, prescribing patterns differed by age and sex. Vaccines/toxoids, penicillins and β-lactam antimicrobials, and antiasthmatic drugs were most commonly prescribed in persons younger than 19 years. Antidepressants and opioid analgesics were most commonly prescribed in young and middle-aged adults. Cardiovascular drugs were most commonly prescribed in older adults. Women received more prescriptions than men for several drug groups, in particular for antidepressants. For several drug groups, use increased with advancing age.
This study provides valuable baseline information for future studies of drug utilization and drug-related outcomes in this population.

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    Nutrition and metabolism 07/2014; 11(1):34. DOI:10.1186/1743-7075-11-34
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