Article

Using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to assess tumor volume during radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer and its potential impact on adaptive dose escalation and normal tissue sparing.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics (Impact Factor: 4.59). 04/2009; 73(4):1228-34. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.10.054
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To quantify changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid tumor volume on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) during the course of radiation therapy and examine its potential use in adaptive radiotherapy for tumor dose escalation or normal tissue sparing in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
As part of a pilot study, patients with Stage I-III NSCLC underwent FDG-PET/CT before radiotherapy (RT) and in mid-RT (after 40-50 Gy). Gross tumor volumes were contoured on CT and PET scans obtained before and during RT. Three-dimensional conformal RT plans were generated for each patient, first using only pretreatment CT scans. Mid-RT PET volumes were then used to design boost fields.
Fourteen patients with FDG-avid tumors were assessed. Two patients had a complete metabolic response, and 2 patients had slightly increased FDG uptake in the adjacent lung tissue. Mid-RT PET scans were useful in the 10 remaining patients. Mean decreases in CT and PET tumor volumes were 26% (range, +15% to -75%) and 44% (range, +10% to -100%), respectively. Designing boosts based on mid-RT PET allowed for a meaningful dose escalation of 30-102 Gy (mean, 58 Gy) or a reduction in normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 0.4-3% (mean, 2%) in 5 of 6 patients with smaller yet residual tumor volumes.
Tumor metabolic activity and volume can change significantly after 40-50 Gy of RT. Using mid-RT PET volumes, tumor dose can be significantly escalated or NTCP reduced. Clinical studies evaluating patient outcome after PET-based adaptive RT are ongoing.

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