Article

Motorcycle crash characteristics in Nigeria: implication for control.

Department of Surgery, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH) Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria.
Accident; analysis and prevention (Impact Factor: 1.65). 04/2009; 41(2):294-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2008.12.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Despite being the second most common cause of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Nigeria, no study had examined the peculiarities of motorcycle crash site characteristics in Nigeria. We examined and interviewed 363 motorcycle RTI patients in three tertiary hospitals in southwest Nigeria. All the motorcycles are small with capacities between 80 and 125cm3. 68.9% of the patients sustained their injuries while working or going to work and 23.4% on their way to school. 176 (48.5%) of the crashes were with moving vehicles and in 83 (22.3%) cases, either the motorcycle or the other vehicle is moving against the traffic. 37.8% of all crashes occurred at junctions with no roundabout versus 5% at junctions with roundabout. Some risky practices of the patient included carrying more than 2 persons (15.02%), travelling without headlight at night (31.7%) and not wearing helmets (96.5%). This study showed that risky behavior among motorcycle riders, chaotic traffic and road design faults accounted for most of the motorcycle crashes. The implications for the prevention and control of motorcycle injuries were discussed.

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