Article

Selenium and vitamin E: interesting biology and dashed hope.

Affiliations of author: Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Center for Clinical & Translational Research, and Department of Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH.
CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment (Impact Factor: 15.16). 03/2009; 101(5):283-5. DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djp009
Source: PubMed
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