Article

Effects of Information on Consumers' Willingness to Pay for GM-Corn-Fed Beef

Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization 02/2007; 2(2):1058-1058. DOI:10.2202/1542-0485.1058
Source: RePEc

ABSTRACT There has been growing public opposition against genetically modified (GM) foods. Using a dichotomous choice contingent valuation methodology, we analyze the factors that affect the willingness to pay for GM-corn-fed beef by consumers in Spokane, Washington. The mean discount required to choose the GM-fed beef is small at 8% compared to other studies in Europe and Japan. Further, half the sample was provided information about biotechnology, and the effect of this information is analyzed.

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