Article

An evaluation of health-related quality of life of patients aroused from prolonged coma when treated by physiotherapists with or without training in the 'Academy of Life' programme.

College of Physiotherapy, Wroclaw, Poland.
Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine: AAEM (Impact Factor: 3.06). 06/2013; 20(2):361-5.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients aroused from prolonged coma after a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated by physiotherapists trained in the 'Academy of Life' programme. It was assumed that physiotherapists who acquired this knowledge and experience would create a better therapeutic milieu, and would be more effective than physiotherapists who had not received this training. Material and methods: 40 patients who had suffered a severe TBI in a motor vehicle accident and had been aroused from prolonged coma were examined. All the patients underwent long-term rehabilitation according to a standard, phased programme. They were divided into two numerically even groups: an experimental group, treated by therapists trained in the 'Academy of Life' programme, and a control group, treated by physiotherapists who were not trained in this programme. The research instruments included an analysis of documentation, a structured clinical interview, and the Quality of Life Scale. Results: As hypothesized, the experimental group showed significant improvement in HRQOL, whereas in the control group improvement was statistically non-significant. Conclusions: The patients from the experimental group, treated by physiotherapists trained in the 'Academy of Life', obtained a significantly greater improvement in physical and social functioning, and thus in HRQOL, than patients from the control group.

Full-text

Available from: Maria Pąchalska, Aug 01, 2014
1 Follower
 · 
54 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aim. One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneous EEG and event related potentials (ERPs). Case study. The case is presented of an Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport. He wanted to resume his activities by means of neurofeedback training. His QEEG/ERP parameters were assessed before and after 4 intensive sessions of neurotherapy. Dramatic and statistically significant changes that could not be explained by error measurement were observed in the patient. Conclusion. Neurofeedback training in the subject under study increased the amplitude of the monitoring component of ERPs generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, accompanied by an increase in beta activity over the medial prefrontal cortex. Taking these changes together, it can be concluded that that even a few sessions of neurofeedback in a high performance brain can significantly activate the prefrontal cortical areas associated with increasing confidence in sport performance.
    Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine: AAEM 12/2014; 21(4):871–875. DOI:10.5604/12321966.1129950 · 3.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. The aim of the research was an assessment of the differences in the self-evaluation of health-related quality of life during the treatment of post-burn scars on the upper limbs of pre-school and school children. Materials and method. A group of 120 children were examined – 66 boys and 54 girls, divided into a pre-school group of 60 children (average age 4.3 ± 1.7) and a primary school group of 60 children (average age 10.4 ± 1.2). The structured interview and an adopted Visual Analog Anxiety Scale and Visual Analog Unpleasant Events Tolerance Scale were used to evaluate the level of plaster tolerance, and anxiety caused by the removal of dressings during treatment. Results. In the first test, In both groups, a low tolerance was noted to the pressure plaster, with the pre-school aged children obtaining worse results (x=18.9 ± SD 10.16) than those of school age (x=33.65± SD 13,21), regardless of gender. Pre-school children were afraid (x=47.5 ± SD 24.26), while school-aged children were not afraid of having the plaster removed (x=20.5 ± SD 9.46). The differences between the groups were statistically significant. In the fourth and final test on pre-school aged children, the tolerance of plasters had improved (x=23.24 ± SD 15.43) obtaining a value somewhat lower than for school-aged children (32.4 ± SD 6.45), as well as a noted fall in the anxiety level (30.83 ± SD 23.38) with an average value insignificantly higher than that recorded for the children of school age (15.83 ± SD 6.19). Conclusions. The tests confirmed the appearance of differences in the self-evaluation of health-related life quality in pre-school and school-aged children.
    Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine: AAEM 12/2014; 21(4):861–865. · 3.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: objective. The aim of the research was an assessment of the differences in the self-evaluation of health-related quality of life during the treatment of post-burn scars on the upper limbs of pre-school and school children. materials and method. a group of 120 children were examined - 66 boys and 54 girls, divided into a pre-school group of 60 children (average age 4.3 ± 1.7) and a primary school group of 60 children (average age 10.4 ± 1.2). The structured interview and an adopted Visual Analog Anxiety Scale and Visual Analog Unpleasant Events Tolerance Scale were used to evaluate the level of plaster tolerance, and anxiety caused by the removal of dressings during treatment. results. In the first test, In both groups, a low tolerance was noted to the pressure plaster, with the pre-school aged children obtaining worse results (x=18.9 ± SD 10.16) than those of school age (x=33.65± SD 13,21), regardless of gender. Pre-school children were afraid (x=47.5 ± SD 24.26), while school-aged children were not afraid of having the plaster removed (x=20.5 ± SD 9.46). The differences between the groups were statistically significant. In the fourth and final test on pre-school aged children, the tolerance of plasters had improved (x=23.24 ± SD 15.43) obtaining a value somewhat lower than for school-aged children (32.4 ± SD 6.45), as well as a noted fall in the anxiety level (30.83 ± SD 23.38) with an average value insignificantly higher than that recorded for the children of school age (15.83 ± SD 6.19). conclusions. The tests confirmed the appearance of differences in the self-evaluation of health-related life quality in pre-school and school-aged children.
    Annals of agricultural and environmental medicine: AAEM 11/2014; 21(4):861-5. DOI:10.5604/12321966.1129947 · 3.06 Impact Factor