Article

RNF168 Binds and Amplifies Ubiquitin Conjugates on Damaged Chromosomes to Allow Accumulation of Repair Proteins

Institute of Cancer Biology and Centre for Genotoxic Stress Research, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Cell (Impact Factor: 31.96). 03/2009; 136(3):435-46. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2008.12.041
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) not only interrupt the genetic information, but also disrupt the chromatin structure, and both impairments require repair mechanisms to ensure genome integrity. We showed previously that RNF8-mediated chromatin ubiquitylation protects genome integrity by promoting the accumulation of repair factors at DSBs. Here, we provide evidence that, while RNF8 is necessary to trigger the DSB-associated ubiquitylations, it is not sufficient to sustain conjugated ubiquitin in this compartment. We identified RNF168 as a novel chromatin-associated ubiquitin ligase with an ability to bind ubiquitin. We show that RNF168 interacts with ubiquitylated H2A, assembles at DSBs in an RNF8-dependent manner, and, by targeting H2A and H2AX, amplifies local concentration of lysine 63-linked ubiquitin conjugates to the threshold required for retention of 53BP1 and BRCA1. Thus, RNF168 defines a new pathway involving sequential ubiquitylations on damaged chromosomes and uncovers a functional cooperation between E3 ligases in genome maintenance.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
224 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In response to DNA damage, cells activate a highly conserved and complex kinase-based signaling network, commonly referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR), to safeguard genomic integrity. The DDR consists of a set of tightly regulated events, including detection of DNA damage, accumulation of DNA repair factors at the site of damage, and finally physical repair of the lesion. Upon overwhelming damage the DDR provokes detrimental cellular actions by involving the apoptotic machinery and inducing a coordinated demise of the damaged cells (DNA damage-induced apoptosis, DDIA). These diverse actions involve transcriptional activation of several genes that govern the DDR. Moreover, recent observations highlighted the role of ubiquitylation in orchestrating the DDR, providing a dynamic cellular regulatory circuit helping to guarantee genomic stability and cellular homeostasis (Popovic et al., 2014). One of the hallmarks of human cancer is genomic instability (Hanahan and Weinberg, 2011). Not surprisingly, deregulation of the DDR can lead to human diseases, including cancer, and can induce resistance to genotoxic anti-cancer therapy (Lord and Ashworth, 2012). Here, we summarize the role of ubiquitin-signaling in the DDR with special emphasis on its role in cancer and highlight the therapeutic value of the ubiquitin-conjugation machinery as a target in anti-cancer treatment strategy.
    Frontiers in Genetics 04/2015; 1(6). DOI:10.3389/fgene.2015.00098
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Following DNA double-strand breaks cells activate several DNA-damage response protein kinases, which then trigger histone H2AX phosphorylation and the accumulation of proteins such as MDC1, p53-binding protein 1, and breast cancer gene 1 at the damage site to promote DNA double-strand breaks repair. We identified a novel biomarker, Bora (previously called C13orf34), that is associated with radiosensitivity. In the current study, we set out to investigate how Bora might be involved in response to irradiation. We found a novel function of Bora in DNA damage repair response. Bora down-regulation increased colony formation in cells exposed to irradiation. This increased resistance to irradiation in Bora-deficient cells is likely due to a faster rate of double-strand breaks repair. After irradiation, Bora-knockdown cells displayed increased G2-M cell cycle arrest and increased Chk2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, Bora specifically interacted with the tandem breast cancer gene 1 C-terminal domain of MDC1 in a phosphorylation dependent manner, and overexpression of Bora could abolish irradiation induced MDC1 foci formation. In summary, Bora may play a significant role in radiosensitivity through the regulation of MDC1 and DNA repair.
    PLoS ONE 01/2015; 10(3):e0119208. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0119208 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cell cycle checkpoints activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are essential for the maintenance of the genomic integrity of proliferating cells. Following DNA damage, cells must detect the break and either transiently block cell cycle progression, to allow time for repair, or exit the cell cycle. Reversal of a DNA-damage-induced checkpoint not only requires the repair of these lesions, but a cell must also prevent permanent exit from the cell cycle and actively terminate checkpoint signalling to allow cell cycle progression to resume. It is becoming increasingly clear that despite the shared mechanisms of DNA damage detection throughout the cell cycle, the checkpoint and its reversal are precisely tuned to each cell cycle phase. Furthermore, recent findings challenge the dogmatic view that complete repair is a precondition for cell cycle resumption. In this Commentary, we highlight cell-cycle-dependent differences in checkpoint signalling and recovery after a DNA DSB, and summarise the molecular mechanisms that underlie the reversal of DNA damage checkpoints, before discussing when and how cell fate decisions after a DSB are made.
    Journal of Cell Science 01/2015; DOI:10.1242/jcs.163766 · 5.33 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
32 Downloads
Available from
Nov 11, 2014