Changes in Cancer Mortality among HIV-Infected Patients: The Mortalite 2005 Survey

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm), U593, Bordeaux, France.
Clinical Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 8.89). 04/2009; 48(5):633-9. DOI: 10.1086/596766
Source: PubMed


The goal of the current study was to describe the distribution and characteristics of malignancy related deaths among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with use of data obtained from a national survey conducted in France in 2005 and to compare with results obtained from a similar survey conducted in 2000.
The underlying cause of death was documented using a standardized questionnaire fulfilled in French hospital wards and networks that were involved in the treatment of HIV-infected patients.
Among the 1042 deaths reported in 2005 (964 were reported in 2000), 344 were cancer related (34%), which represented a significant increase from 2000 (29% of deaths were cancer related) (P=.02); 134 of the cancer-related deaths were AIDS related and 210 were not AIDS related. Among the cancer-related causes of death, the proportion of hepatitis-related cancers (6% in 2000 vs. 11% in 2005) and non-AIDS/hepatitis-related cancers (38% in 2000 vs 50% in 2005) significantly increased from 2000 to 2005 (P=.03 and P=.01, respectively), compared with the proportion of cancer that was AIDS related and adjusting for age and sex. Among cases involving AIDS, the proportion of non-Hodgkin lymphoma-associated deaths did not change statistically significantly between 2000 and 2005 (11% and 10% of deaths, respectively).
In this study, an increasing proportion of lethal non-AIDS-related cancers was demonstrated from 2000 to 2005; meanwhile, the proportion of lethal AIDS-related cancers remained stable among HIV-infected patients. Thus, cancer prophylaxis, early diagnosis, and improved management should be included in the routine long-term follow-up of HIV-infected patients.

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    • "Berry et al., in a contemporary analysis (2001–2008), were also unable to find an increase in hospitalizations for non-AIDS malignancies [3]. In contrast, it was recently shown that the relative frequency of deaths due to non-AIDS malignancies have increased in France [28]. In addition, large epidemiological studies has shown an increased incidence of non-AIDS malignancies in HIV-infected groups, two-fold higher than that found in the general population [29,30]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background In high-income settings, the spectrum of morbidity and mortality experienced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has switched from predominantly AIDS-related to non-AIDS-related conditions. In the context of universal access to care, we evaluated whether that shift would apply in Brazil, a middle-income country with universal access to treatment, as compared to France. Methods Two hospital-based cohorts of HIV-infected individuals were used for this analysis: the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort in South Western France and the Evandro Chagas Research Institute (IPEC) Cohort of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Severe morbid events (AIDS- and non-AIDS-related) were defined as all clinical diagnoses associated with a hospitalization of ≥48 hours. Trends in the incidence rate of events and their determinants were estimated while adjusting for within-subject correlation using generalized estimating equations models with an auto-regressive correlation structure and robust standard errors. Result Between January 2000 and December 2008, 7812 adult patients were followed for a total of 41,668 person-years (PY) of follow-up. Throughout the study period, 90% of the patients were treated with cART. The annual incidence rate of AIDS and non-AIDS events, and of deaths significantly decreased over the years, from 6.2, 21.1, and 1.9 AIDS, non-AIDS events, and deaths per 100 PY in 2000 to 4.3, 14.9, and 1.5/100 PY in 2008. The annual incidence rates of non-AIDS events surpassed that of AIDS-events during the entire study period. High CD4 cell counts were associated with a lower incidence rate of AIDS and non-AIDS events as well as with lower rates of specific non-AIDS events, such as bacterial, hepatic, viral, neurological, and cardiovascular conditions. Adjusted analysis showed that severe morbidity was associated with lower CD4 counts and higher plasma HIV RNAs but not with setting (IPEC versus Aquitaine). Conclusions As information on severe morbidities for HIV-infected patients remain scarce, data on hospitalizations are valuable to identify priorities for case management and to improve the quality of life of patients with a chronic disease requiring life-long treatment. Immune restoration is highly effective in reducing AIDS and non-AIDS severe morbid events irrespective of the setting.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 05/2014; 14(1):278. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-278 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    • "Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), there has been a dramatic decrease in the incidence of AIDS-related morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive patients [1]. However, while the incidence of AIDS-defining cancers (ADC) has steadily declined, there have been reports of an apparent increase in the number of non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADC) [2-11] and increases in cancer-related mortality [12,13]. This has led to new challenges for those responsible for the management and treatment of HIV-positive individuals. "
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    ABSTRACT: Non-AIDS defining cancers (NADC) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive individuals. Using data from a large international cohort of HIV-positive individuals, we described the incidence of NADC from 2004--2010, and described subsequent mortality and predictors of these. Individuals were followed from 1st January 2004/enrolment in study, until the earliest of a new NADC, 1st February 2010, death or six months after the patient's last visit. Incidence rates were estimated for each year of follow-up, overall and stratified by gender, age and mode of HIV acquisition. Cumulative risk of mortality following NADC diagnosis was summarised using Kaplan-Meier methods, with follow-up for these analyses from the date of NADC diagnosis until the patient's death, 1st February 2010 or 6 months after the patient's last visit. Factors associated with mortality following NADC diagnosis were identified using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Over 176,775 person-years (PY), 880 (2.1%) patients developed a new NADC (incidence: 4.98/1000PY [95% confidence interval 4.65, 5.31]). Over a third of these patients (327, 37.2%) had died by 1st February 2010. Time trends for lung cancer, anal cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma were broadly consistent. Kaplan-Meier cumulative mortality estimates at 1, 3 and 5 years after NADC diagnosis were 28.2% [95% CI 25.1-31.2], 42.0% [38.2-45.8] and 47.3% [42.4-52.2], respectively. Significant predictors of poorer survival after diagnosis of NADC were lung cancer (compared to other cancer types), male gender, non-white ethnicity, and smoking status. Later year of diagnosis and higher CD4 count at NADC diagnosis were associated with improved survival. The incidence of NADC remained stable over the period 2004--2010 in this large observational cohort. The prognosis after diagnosis of NADC, in particular lung cancer and disseminated cancer, is poor but has improved somewhat over time. Modifiable risk factors, such as smoking and low CD4 counts, were associated with mortality following a diagnosis of NADC.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 10/2013; 13(1):471. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-13-471 · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    • "tuberculosis) and cancers that are responsible for AIDS associated mortality [4,5]. In developed countries where the HIV epidemic has matured and most people living with HIV (PLHIV) are on anti-retroviral therapy, cancer is now responsible for at least a third of all mortality [6]. The incidence of cancer among PLHIV in developing countries too has increased but there is insufficient data on actual incidence and prevalence [7,8]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The epidemic of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa varies significantly across countries in the region with high prevalence in Southern Africa and Nigeria. Cancer is increasingly identified as a complication of HIV infection with higher incidence and mortality in this group than in the general population. Without cancer prevention strategies, improved cancer treatment alone would be an insufficient response to this increasing burden among people living with HIV (PLHIV). Although previous studies have noted low levels of awareness of cancers in sub-Saharan Africa none has examined the knowledge and perceptions of cancer among people living with HIV/AIDS. Methods Focus group discussions (FGD) and Key Informant Interviews (KII) were carried out in 4 high volume tertiary care institutions that offer HIV care and treatment in Nigeria. FGD and KII assessed participants’ knowledge of cancer, attitudes towards cancer risk and cancer screening practices. Results The mean age (SD) of the FGD participants was 38 (2.8) years. Most participants had heard about cancer and considered it a fatal disease but displayed poor knowledge of the causes of cancer in general and of AIDs associated cancers in particular. PLHIV in Nigeria expressed fear, denial and disbelief about their perceived cancer risk. Some of the participants had heard about cancer screening but very few participants had ever been screened. Conclusion Our findings of poor knowledge of cancer among PLHIV in Nigeria indicate the need for health care providers and the government to intervene by developing primary cancer prevention strategies for this population.
    Infectious Agents and Cancer 10/2012; 7(1):28. DOI:10.1186/1750-9378-7-28 · 2.36 Impact Factor
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