Article

Use of differential isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry to analyze capacitation-associated changes in the phosphorylation status of mouse sperm proteins.

Departments of Chemistry & Chemical Biology and Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180, USA.
Journal of Proteome Research (Impact Factor: 5). 03/2009; 8(3):1431-40.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Mammalian sperm need to reside in the female reproductive tract for a finite period of time before acquiring fertilizing competence. The biochemical changes associated with this process are collectively known as "capacitation". With the use of the mouse as an experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that capacitation is associated with a cAMP-dependent increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, little is known about the identity and function of the protein targets of this phosphorylation cascade. In the present work, we have used differential isotopic labeling coupled with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC)-based phosphopeptide enrichment and analysis on a hybrid linear ion trap/FT-ICR mass spectrometer to measure the changes in protein phosphorylation resulting from the capacitation process. As no kinase activators and/or phosphatase inhibitors were used in the preparation of the sperm samples, phosphorylated residues identified in this study represent in vivo sites of phosphorylation. Also, in contrast to other methods which rely on the incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at the protein level (e.g., SILAC), the present technique is based on the Fisher esterification of protein digests, allowing for the comparison of phosphorylation status in the absence of protein synthesis. This approach resulted in the identification of 55 unique, in vivo sites of phosphorylation and permitted the relative extent of phosphorylation, as a consequence of capacitation, to be calculated for 42 different phosphopeptides. This work represents the first effort to determine which specific protein phosphorylation sites change their phosphorylation status in vivo as a result of the mammalian capacitation process.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
97 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cyclases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease 07/2014; · 5.09 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful approach for high-throughput quantitative proteomics. SILAC allows highly accurate protein quantitation through metabolic encoding of whole cell proteomes using stable isotope labeled amino acids. Since its introduction in 2002, SILAC has become increasingly popular. In this chapter we review the methodology and application of SILAC, with an emphasis on three research areas: dynamics of posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and protein turnover.
    Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 01/2014; 806:93-106. · 2.01 Impact Factor
  • Frontiers in Bioscience 01/2011; 16(1):1315. · 4.25 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
10 Downloads
Available from
Jul 3, 2014