Article

Cushing's Disease in Dogs and Humans

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Hormone Research (Impact Factor: 2.48). 02/2009; 71 Suppl 1:140-3. DOI: 10.1159/000178058
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Cushing's disease (CD) is a common endocrinological disorder in dogs with an estimated incidence of 1 to 2 cases/1,000 dogs/year. This is in contrast to humans in whom CD is rare. The clinical presentation of CD, however, is highly similar between dogs and humans, with characteristic signs, such as abdominal obesity, weight gain, fatigue, muscle atrophy and skin changes. Canine CD may therefore serve as an animal model for human CD, especially since therapeutic canine hypophysectomy can generate substantial amounts of primary corticotroph adenoma tissue for in vitro research purposes. In a recent study, we found that dopamine (DA) D(2) and somatostatin (SS) receptor subtypes are well expressed in canine corticotroph adenomas, but there are some distinct differences compared with the expression profile observed in human CD. These differences need to be considered when using canine CD as a model to evaluate the efficacy of novel DA/SS compounds for potential use in human CD. CASE REPORT: This case involves an 8-year-old female dog that developed signs of exercise intolerance, muscle weakness and polyuria/polydipsia due to an adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma. The dog underwent curative transsphenoidal hypophysectomy and has remained in complete remission in the 3.5 years since surgery.

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    • "This has resulted in another similarity: both humans and dogs suffer more frequently from similar disorders, such as obesity, endocrinologic syndromes , osteoarthritis (OA), and degenerative spinal diseases (Bostman 1993; Bray and Burbidge 1998; German 2006; Heliovaara 1987; Kiss et al. 2002a; Liuke et al. 2005; Muraki et al. 2009; Rijnberk, Kooistra, Mol 2003). As a result, dogs can serve as spontaneous disease animal models for certain of these diseases (An and Masuda 2006; Casal and Haskins 2006; de Bruin et al. 2009; Kooistra et al. 2009). "
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    • "By getting older and increasingly obese, humans and pets suffer more frequently from similar disorders, including endocrinological syndromes, osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative spinal diseases (Heliovaara 1987; Bostman 1993; Bray & Burbidge 1998; Kiss et al. 2002a; Rijnberk et al. 2003; Clarke et al. 2005; Liuke et al. 2005; Clarke & Bennett 2006; German 2006; Muraki et al. 2009; Slingerland et al. 2011). For specific human diseases, companion animals, including pet patients, can serve as spontaneous disease animal models (Casal & Haskins 2006; Masuda 2006; de Bruin et al. 2009; Kooistra et al. 2009). "
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