Article

High prevalence and early complication of symptomatic vertebral fracture in elderly people treated with high-dose glucocorticoids.

Department of Clinical Cell Biology, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan.
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Impact Factor: 4.22). 02/2009; 57(1):188-9. DOI: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2009.02077.x
Source: PubMed
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