Article

Adaptive filtering to reduce global interference in non-invasive NIRS measures of brain activation: how well and when does it work?

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.
NeuroImage (Impact Factor: 6.13). 02/2009; 45(3):788-94. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2008.12.048
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In previous work we introduced a novel method for reducing global interference, based on adaptive filtering, to improve the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of evoked hemodynamic responses measured non-invasively with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Here, we address the issue of how to generally apply the proposed adaptive filtering method. A total of 156 evoked visual response measurements, collected from 15 individuals, were analyzed. The similarity (correlation) between measurements with far and near source-detector separations collected during the rest period before visual stimulation was used as indicator of global interference dominance. A detailed analysis of CNR improvement in oxy-hemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HHb), as a function of the rest period correlation coefficient, is presented. Results show that for O(2)Hb measurements, 66% exhibited substantial global interference. For this dataset, dominated by global interference, 71% of the measurements revealed CNR improvements after adaptive filtering, with a mean CNR improvement of 60%. No CNR improvement was observed for HHb. This study corroborates our previous finding that adaptive filtering provides an effective method to increase CNR when there is strong global interference, and also provides a practical way for determining when and where to apply this technique.

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