Article

Mutations of CASK cause an X-linked brain malformation phenotype with microcephaly and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum.

Institut für Humangenetik, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
Nature Genetics (Impact Factor: 29.65). 10/2008; 40(9):1065-7. DOI: 10.1038/ng.194
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT CASK is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that interacts with the transcription factor TBR1 and regulates expression of genes involved in cortical development such as RELN. Here we describe a previously unreported X-linked brain malformation syndrome caused by mutations of CASK. All five affected individuals with CASK mutations had congenital or postnatal microcephaly, disproportionate brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia, and severe mental retardation.

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