Article

A network biology approach to aging in yeast.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bioinformatics Program, Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Department of Biomedical Engineering. Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 02/2009; 106(4):1145-50. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0812551106
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In this study, a reverse-engineering strategy was used to infer and analyze the structure and function of an aging and glucose repressed gene regulatory network in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The method uses transcriptional perturbations to model the functional interactions between genes as a system of first-order ordinary differential equations. The resulting network model correctly identified the known interactions of key regulators in a 10-gene network from the Snf1 signaling pathway, which is required for expression of glucose-repressed genes upon calorie restriction. The majority of interactions predicted by the network model were confirmed using promoter-reporter gene fusions in gene-deletion mutants and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, revealing a more complex network architecture than previously appreciated. The reverse-engineered network model also predicted an unexpected role for transcriptional regulation of the SNF1 gene by hexose kinase enzyme/transcriptional repressor Hxk2, Mediator subunit Med8, and transcriptional repressor Mig1. These interactions were validated experimentally and used to design new experiments demonstrating Snf1 and its transcriptional regulators Hxk2 and Mig1 as modulators of chronological lifespan. This work demonstrates the value of using network inference methods to identify and characterize the regulators of complex phenotypes, such as aging.

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