Article

Varus inclination of the proximal tibia or the distal femur does not influence high tibial osteotomy outcome.

Department of Orthopaedics, HS-105, Erasmus University Medical Centre, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy (Impact Factor: 2.68). 04/2009; 17(4):390-5. DOI: 10.1007/s00167-008-0708-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We have analysed retrospectively the influence of different sources of knee deformity on failure of closing wedge high tibial valgus osteotomy (HTO). Preoperative frontal plane varus deformities of the lower extremity, distal femur and proximal tibia, and medial convergence of the knee joint line were assessed on a standard whole leg radiograph in 76 patients. Using the logistic regression model, the probability of survival for HTO was 77% (SD 4%) at 10-years follow-up. Varus deformity of the lower extremity (< 175 degrees ), and medial convergence of the knee joint line (> 3 degrees ) were identified as preoperative risk factors for conversion to arthroplasty (P = 0.03 and P = 0.006). We found no evidence that varus inclination of the proximal tibia or distal femur influences long-term survival of HTO.

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