Article

Using theory and technology to design a practical and generalizable smoking reduction intervention

Kaiser Permanente-Colorado, Institute for Health Research, Denver, CO 80237-8066, USA.
Health Promotion Practice (Impact Factor: 0.55). 11/2009; 11(5):675-84. DOI: 10.1177/1524839908324778
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of this article is to describe the process of using theory to form strategies for a generalizable smoking reduction intervention delivered through multiple intervention modalities. This report describes the process of integrating theory, data from diverse sources, staff from three different organizations, and different intervention modalities into an efficient, large-scale smoking reduction program featuring automated data from electronic medical records, computer-assisted telephone interviews, and tailored newsletters. The authors successfully developed a program that was consistently implemented as planned for 320 smokers in a managed care organization. The mapping of theory to intervention, data transfer and security procedures, and processes and strategies used to overcome challenges to intervention implementation should provide lessons learned for similar health promotion projects. Few intervention studies discuss details of how they translate theory into practice or how they integrate different modalities and collaborating institutions, but such integration is critical for project success.

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