Presence of Antibodies against Genogroup VI Norovirus in Humans

Virology Journal (Impact Factor: 2.18). 06/2013; 10(1):176. DOI: 10.1186/1743-422X-10-176
Source: PubMed


Noroviruses are important enteric pathogens in humans and animals. Recently, we reported a novel canine norovirus (CaNoV) in dogs with diarrhea belonging to a new genogroup (GVI). No data are available on exposure of humans to this virus.

Sera from 373 small animal veterinarians and 120 age-matched population controls were tested for IgG antibodies to CaNoV by a recombinant virus like particle based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Antibodies to CaNoV were found in 22.3% of the veterinarians and 5.8% of the control group (p < 0.001). Mean corrected OD450 values for CaNoV antibodies were significantly higher in small animal veterinarians compared to the control group.

These findings suggest that CaNoV may infect humans and small animal veterinarians are at an increased risk for exposure to this virus. Additional studies are needed to assess if this virus is able to cause disease in humans.

Download full-text


Available from: Jan Vinjé, Sep 29, 2015
1 Follower
23 Reads
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of the recently described genogroup VI canine noroviruses (CNVs) in dogs in Europe, 510 serum samples from dogs in 14 European countries were tested for anti-IgG CNV antibodies.Seropositive dogs were found widespread throughout Europe. Dogs exclusively with antibodies against human noroviruses were also found.
    Clinical and vaccine Immunology: CVI 03/2014; 21(6). DOI:10.1128/CVI.00048-14 · 2.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sapovirus, a member of the Caliciviridae family, is an important cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans and pigs. Currently, the porcine sapovirus (PSaV) Cowden strain remains the only cultivable member of the Sapovirus genus. While some caliciviruses are known to utilize carbohydrate receptors for entry and infection, a functional receptor for sapovirus is unknown. To characterize the functional receptor of the Cowden strain of PSaV, we undertook a comprehensive series of protein-ligand biochemical assays in mock and PSaV-infected cell culture and/or piglet intestinal tissue sections. PSaV revealed neither hemagglutination activity with red blood cells from any species nor binding activity to synthetic histo-blood group antigens, indicating that PSaV does not use histo-blood group antigens as receptors. Attachment and infection of PSaV were markedly blocked by sialic acid and Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NA), suggesting a role for α2,3-linked, α2,6-linked or α2,8-linked sialic acid in virus attachment. However, viral attachment and infection were only partially inhibited by treatment of cells with sialidase S (SS) or Maackia amurensis lectin (MAL), both specific for α2,3-linked sialic acid, or Sambucus nigra lectin (SNL), specific for α2,6-linked sialic acid. These results indicated that PSaV recognizes both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids for viral attachment and infection. Treatment of cells with proteases or with benzyl 4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (benzylGalNAc), which inhibits O-linked glycosylation, also reduced virus binding and infection, whereas inhibition of glycolipd synthesis or N-linked glycosylation had no such effect on virus binding or infection. These data suggest PSaV binds to cellular receptors that consist of α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids on glycoproteins attached via O-linked glycosylation.
    PLoS Pathogens 06/2014; 10(6):e1004172. DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1004172 · 7.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Unlabelled: Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with strains classified into genogroups IV and VI. Whereas it is known that GI to GIII noroviruses bind to HBGAs and GV noroviruses recognize terminal sialic acid residues, the attachment factors for GIV and GVI noroviruses have not been reported. This study sought to determine the carbohydrate binding specificity of CNV and to compare it to the binding specificities of noroviruses from other genogroups. A panel of synthetic oligosaccharides were used to assess the binding specificity of CNV virus-like particles (VLPs) and identified α1,2-fucose as a key attachment factor. CNV VLP binding to canine saliva and tissue samples using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunohistochemistry confirmed that α1,2-fucose-containing H and A antigens of the HBGA family were recognized by CNV. Phenotyping studies demonstrated expression of these antigens in a population of dogs. The virus-ligand interaction was further characterized using blockade studies, cell lines expressing HBGAs, and enzymatic removal of candidate carbohydrates from tissue sections. Recognition of HBGAs by CNV provides new insights into the evolution of noroviruses and raises concerns regarding the potential for zoonotic transmission of CNV to humans. Importance: Infections with human norovirus cause acute gastroenteritis in millions of people each year worldwide. Noroviruses can also affect nonhuman species and are divided into 6 different groups based on their capsid sequences. Human noroviruses in genogroups I and II interact with histo-blood group antigen carbohydrates, bovine noroviruses (genogroup III) interact with alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) carbohydrates, and murine norovirus (genogroup V) recognizes sialic acids. The canine-specific strains of norovirus are grouped into genogroups IV and VI, and this study is the first to characterize which carbohydrate structures they can recognize. Using canine norovirus virus-like particles, this work shows that representative genogroup IV and VI viruses can interact with histo-blood group antigens. The binding specificity of canine noroviruses is therefore very similar to that of the human norovirus strains classified into genogroups I and II. This raises interesting questions about the evolution of noroviruses and suggests it may be possible for canine norovirus to infect humans.
    Journal of Virology 07/2014; 88(18). DOI:10.1128/JVI.01008-14 · 4.44 Impact Factor
Show more