Article

Inoculating communities against vaccine scare stories

Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: .
The Lancet Infectious Diseases (Impact Factor: 19.45). 05/2013; 13(7). DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70131-2
Source: PubMed
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