Article

Frequent assessment of negative symptoms does not induce depressed mood.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8790, USA.
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings (Impact Factor: 1.49). 12/2008; 15(4):296-300. DOI: 10.1007/s10880-008-9127-6
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Use of real-time data collection is rapidly expanding in the medical sciences and questions have been raised as to whether frequent ratings of disease symptoms could evoke depressed mood. This study investigated the effect of an intensive momentary assessment protocol on depressed mood. Community rheumatology patients (N = 105) were recruited to participate in a 30-day momentary assessment protocol of pain and fatigue. Patients were randomly signaled and completed approximately 6 ratings per day and at bedtime. Beck Depression Inventory-II scores were obtained prior to and at the completion of the protocol. Thirty-six percent of patients were classified initially as mild to severely depressed, and 31% percent at the end of the protocol. Depression scores were significantly lower following the protocol (p < .001). Whereas 10% of patients shifted into a more depressed category at the end of the protocol, 20% shifted into a less depressed category. These findings suggest frequent assessment of pain and fatigue may not induce depressed mood, and may in some instances be associated with a small reduction in depressed mood.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
58 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories indicates that the low back pain episode is short-lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long-term, low back pain often runs persistent course with around two thirds estimated to be in pain after 12-months. Some individuals never have low back pain, but most have it on-and-off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain condition is usually a life-long experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted in order to understand causality, treatment effect and prognostic factors, and to study the possible association of trajectories with pathologies.
    Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology. 01/2013;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Objectives Assessment of state anxiety is frequently required in clinical and research settings, but its measurement using standard multi-item inventories entails practical challenges. Such inventories are increasingly complemented by paper-and-pencil, single-item visual analogue scales measuring state anxiety (VAS-A), which allow rapid assessment of current anxiety states. Computerized versions of VAS-A offer additional advantages, including facilitated and accurate data collection and analysis, and applicability to computer-based protocols. Here, we establish the psychometric properties of a computerized VAS-A. Methods Experiment 1 assessed the reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity of the computerized VAS-A in a non-selected sample. Experiment 2 assessed its sensitivity to increase in state anxiety following social stress induction, in participants with high levels of social anxiety. Results Experiment 1 demonstrated the computerized VAS-A's test-retest reliability (r=.44, p<.001); convergent validity with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory's state subscale (STAI-State; r=.60, p<.001); and discriminant validity as indicated by significantly lower correlations between VAS-A and different psychological measures relative to the correlation between VAS-A and STAI-State. Experiment 2 demonstrated the VAS-A's sensitivity to changes in state anxiety via a significant pre- to during-stressor rise in VAS-A scores (F(1,48)=25.13, p<.001). Limitations Set-order administration of measures, absence of clinically-anxious population, and gender-unbalanced samples. Conclusions The adequate psychometric characteristics, combined with simple and rapid administration, make the computerized VAS-A a valuable self-rating tool for state anxiety. It may prove particularly useful for clinical and research settings where multi-item inventories are less applicable, including computer-based treatment and assessment protocols. The VAS-A is freely available: http://www.tau.ac.il/∼yair1/vas.html.
    Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry 12/2014; · 2.23 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories indicates that the low back pain 'episode' is short lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long term, low back pain often runs a persistent course with around two-thirds of patients estimated to be in pain after 12 months. Some individuals never have low back pain, but most have it on and off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain 'condition' is usually a lifelong experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted to understand causality, treatment effect and prognostic factors and to study the possible association of trajectories with pathologies.
    Best practice & research. Clinical rheumatology 10/2013; 27(5):601-12. · 2.90 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
18 Downloads
Available from
May 30, 2014