Article

How do you feel--now? The anterior insula and human awareness.

Atkinson Research Laboratory, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona 85013, USA.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (Impact Factor: 31.38). 02/2009; 10(1):59-70. DOI: 10.1038/nrn2555
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The anterior insular cortex (AIC) is implicated in a wide range of conditions and behaviours, from bowel distension and orgasm, to cigarette craving and maternal love, to decision making and sudden insight. Its function in the re-representation of interoception offers one possible basis for its involvement in all subjective feelings. New findings suggest a fundamental role for the AIC (and the von Economo neurons it contains) in awareness, and thus it needs to be considered as a potential neural correlate of consciousness.

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