Article

Measuring Team Performance in Simulation-Based Training: Adopting Best Practices for Healthcare

Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, Florida, USA.
Simulation in healthcare: journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (Impact Factor: 1.59). 02/2008; 3(1):33-41. DOI: 10.1097/SIH.0b013e3181626276
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Team performance measurement is a critical and frequently overlooked component of an effective simulation-based training system designed to build teamwork competencies. Quality team performance measurement is essential for systematically diagnosing team performance and subsequently making decisions concerning feedback and remediation. However, the complexities of team performance pose a challenge to effectively measuring team performance. This article synthesizes the scientific literature on this topic and provides a set of best practices for designing and implementing team performance measurement systems in simulation-based training.

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