Article

Prevalence of netB among some clinical isolates of Clostridium perfringens from animals in the United States.

Department of Pathobiology and Veterinary Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.
Veterinary Microbiology (Impact Factor: 3.13). 11/2008; 136(1-2):202-5. DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.10.026
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A previously unknown pore forming toxin, called NetB toxin, which is produced by some Australian strains of Clostridium perfringens has recently been reported. This toxin was reported to be critical to the development of the disease necrotic enteritis, in chickens. To investigate the occurrence of the toxin gene (netB) in non-Australian C. perfringens strains, one hundred and six American isolates of C. perfringens were examined. Ninety-two isolates were from chickens, and 14 were from cattle. The netB gene was found in 14 isolates from chickens (7 from chickens with necrotic enteritis, and 7 from unrelated chickens with no evidence of necrotic enteritis). The netB gene was also detected in an isolate recovered from a 3-year-old cow with liver abscesses. The products of all positive netB PCR reactions were sequenced, and these showed 100% nucleotide identity to the netB sequence published in GenBank. Five isolates which had been recovered from five chickens with necrotic enteritis (from four flocks) were netB negative. An additional 24 isolates recovered from one of these lesioned chickens were also netB negative. The present study represents the first study of C. perfringens isolates outside Australia for netB, and the first identification of netB in an isolate from a species other than chickens. The results indicate that the role of NetB in the induction of necrotic enteritis needs to be further investigated, by determining the disease producing capability of both netB positive strains recovered from normal chickens, and netB negative strains recovered from chickens with necrotic enteritis.

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