Article

The Effect of Price, Brand Name, and Store Name on Buyers' Perceptions of Product Quality An Integrative Review

Journal of Marketing Research (Impact Factor: 2.52). 08/1989; XXVI(August 1989):351-57. DOI: 10.2307/3172907

ABSTRACT The authors integrate previous research that has investigated experimentally the influence of price, brand name, and/or store name on buyers' evaluations of prod¬uct quality. The meta-analysis suggests that, for consumer products, the relation¬ships between price and perceived quality and between brand name and perceived quality are positive and statistically significant. However, the positive effect of store name on perceived quality is small and not statistically significant. Further, the type of experimental design and the strength of the price manipulation are shown to significantly influence the observed effect of price on perceived quality.

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