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Breeding for abiotic stresses in pigeonpea

08/2011; 24:165-174.

ABSTRACT Pigeonpea, often considered as a drought tolerant crop, has the distinct advantage of having a large range of variation for maturity, leading to its adaptation to a wide range of environments and cropping systems. It encounters a number of abiotic stresses during its life cycle. The most important are extremes of moisture and temperature, photoperiod and mineral related stresses. While waterlogging affects plant growth by reducing oxygen diffusion rate between soil and atmosphere and by changing physical and chemical properties of soil, drought and high temperature mostly influence long duration pigeonpea, resulting in its forced maturity. Similarly, low temperature leads to conversion of intracellular water into ice and consequently shrinking of cells and wilting and death of plants. Soil salinity affects pigeonpea plants through osmotic stress and interference with uptake of mineral nutrients. Aluminium toxicity also reduces nutrient uptake efficiency of this crop. Though these stresses have a drastic impact on reducing productivity of pigeonpea, only limited efforts have been made towards screening and development of pigeonpea genotypes having tolerance to these abiotic stresses. Further, even these limited accomplishments are not well-documented. The present review provides comprehensive information vis-a-vis the work done on abiotic stress tolerance in pigeonpea.

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Available from: Arbind K. Choudhary, Aug 10, 2015
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    • "However, crop yield in most production regions is well below its potential and has been stagnant for a number of decades, with increased production during this time largely due to an expansion of harvested area (Saxena, 2005; Odeny, 2007; Jones et al., 2002). In order to increase pigeonpea yield and adaptability, current breeding priorities include photoperiod insensitivity, resistance to biotic pressures , and tolerance to abiotic stresses, notably waterlogged and mineral deficient soils, cold and heat stress, salinity, and drought (Saxena, 2005; Odeny, 2007; Mligo and Craufurd, 2005; Choudhary et al., 2011; Upadhyaya et al., 2007). The long-term viability of major food crops, particularly in light of the increasing need for sustainable production techniques, is dependent upon the use of diverse genetic resources to maintain productivity and adapt to changing climatic conditions and emerging pest and disease pressures (McCouch et al., 2013; Guarino and Lobell, 2011; Xiao et al., 1996). "
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.] is a versatile, stress-tolerant, and nutritious grain legume, possessing traits of value for enhancing the sustainability of dry sub-tropical and tropical agricultural systems. The use of crop wild relatives (CWR) in pigeonpea breeding has been successful in providing important resistance, quality, and breeding efficiency traits to the crop. Current breeding objectives for pigeonpea include increasing its tolerance to abiotic stresses, including heat, cold, drought, and waterlogging. Here we assess the potential for pigeonpea CWR to be further employed in crop improvement by compiling wild species occurrence and ex situ conservation information, producing geographic distribution models for the species, identifying gaps in the comprehensiveness of current germplasm collections, and using ecogeographic information to identify CWR populations with the potential to contribute agronomic traits of priority to breeders. The fifteen prioritized relatives of pigeonpea generally occur in South and Southeast Asia to Australia, with the highest concentrations of species in southern India and northern Australia. These taxa differ considerably among themselves and in comparison to the crop in their adaptations to temperature, precipitation and edaphic conditions. We find that these wild genetic resources are broadly under-represented in ex situ conservation systems, with 80% of species assessed as high priority for further collecting, thus their availability to plant breeders is insufficient. We identify species and highlight geographic locations for further collecting in order to improve the completeness of pigeonpea CWR germplasm collections, with particular emphasis on potential traits for abiotic stress tolerance.
    Biological Conservation 04/2015; 184:259 - 270. DOI:10.1016/j.biocon.2015.01.032 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    • "(A-line) and ICPR 2671 (R-line) show 298-and 301-bp alleles, respectively , on screening with a diagnostic simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker (CcM 0021), while ICPH 2671 seed showing the presence of both alleles (298 and 301 bp) represents true hybrid (Bohra et al. 2011) Fig. 4: The world's first commercial pigeonpea hybrid ICPH 2671 released in India has shown in the picture at pod maturity stage was attributed to its ability to utilize the stored assimilates through anaerobic metabolism during germination and early seedling growth (Choudhary et al. 2011). In another set of experiment, it was also observed that the genotypes with dark seed coat exhibited greater (64.5%) survival in comparison with the light-coloured (54.4%) genotypes. "
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    ABSTRACT: AbstractICRISAT scientists, working with Indian programme counterparts, developed the world's first cytoplasmic‐nuclear male sterility (CMS)‐based commercial hybrid in a food legume, the pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.]. The CMS, in combination with natural outcrossing of the crop, was used to develop viable hybrid breeding technology. Hybrid ICPH 2671 recorded 47% superiority for grain yield over the control variety ‘Maruti’ in multilocation on‐station testing for 4 years. In the on‐farm trials conducted in five Indian states, mean yield of this hybrid (1396 kg/ha) was 46.5% greater than that of the popular cv. ‘Maruti’ (953 kg/ha). Hybrid ICPH 2671 also exhibited high levels of resistance to Fusarium wilt and sterility mosaic diseases. The outstanding performance of this hybrid has led to its release for cultivation in India by both a private seed company (as ‘Pushkal’) and a public sector university (as ‘RV ICPH 2671’). Recent developments in hybrid breeding technology and high yield advantages realized in farmers' fields have given hope for a breakthrough in pigeonpea productivity.
    Plant Breeding 03/2013; 132(5). DOI:10.1111/pbr.12045 · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    • "However, despite its importance in subsistence and sustainable agriculture and continued breeding efforts towards genetic improvement, the average global productivity of pigeonpea has remained static over the last three decades. The yield gap observed between the potential yield and on-farm yield is mainly due to prevalence of various abiotic [4] and biotic factors together with the cultivation of pigeonpea in marginal lands with low input supply and lack of efficient management practices [2]. There has been observed wide yearly fluctuations in total production mainly due to attack by insect pests including Copyright © 2013 SciRes. "
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    ABSTRACT: Pigeonpea [Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh] is an important food legume of the semi-arid tropics (SAT) sustaining live-lihood of millions of people. Stagnant and unstable yield per hectare all over the world is the characteristic feature of this crop. This is primarily ascribed to its susceptibility/sensitivity to a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Among biotic factors, insects such as pod borer (Helicoverpa armigera), pod fly (Melanoagromyza obtusa) and spotted borer (Maruca vitrata) substantially damage the crop and result in significant economic losses. Management of these insects by genetic means has always been considered environment friendly approach. However, genetic improvement has al-ways been impeded by limited genetic variability in the primary gene pool of pigeonpea. Wild species present in the secondary and tertiary gene pools have been reported to carry resistance for such insects. However, transfer of resis-tance through conventional backcrossing has not been much successful. It calls for gene introgression through marker assisted backcrossing (MABC) or advanced backcross breeding (AB breeding). In this review, we have attempted to assess the progress made through conventional and molecular breeding and suggested the ways to move further towards genetic enhancement for insects resistance in pigeonpea.
    American Journal of Plant Sciences 01/2013; 4(2A):372-385. DOI:10.4236/ajps.2013.42A049
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