Article

An Examination of Behavioral Rehearsal During Consultation as a Predictor of Training Outcomes.

Department of Psychology, Temple University, 1701 North 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19122, USA, .
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research (Impact Factor: 3.44). 04/2013; DOI: 10.1007/s10488-013-0490-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The training literature suggests that ongoing support following initial therapist training enhances training outcomes, yet little is known about what occurs during ongoing support and what accounts for its effectiveness. The present study examined consultation sessions provided to 99 clinicians following training in cognitive-behavioral therapy for youth anxiety. Recorded consultation sessions (N = 104) were coded for content and consultative methods. It was hypothesized that behavioral rehearsal (an active learning technique) would predict therapist adherence, skill, self-efficacy, and satisfaction at post-consultation. Regression analyses found no significant relation, however, clinician involvement during consultation sessions positively moderated the relationship between behavioral rehearsals and skill. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

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May 16, 2014