Article

Highlights from a workshop on opportunities for cancer prevention during preadolescence and adolescence.

Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: .
Journal of Adolescent Health (Impact Factor: 2.75). 05/2013; 52(5 Suppl):S8-S14. DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.02.018
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In an effort to explore opportunities for cancer prevention during preadolescence and adolescence, the Cancer Prevention Across the Lifespan workgroup within the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) convened an informal panel of experts for a 2-day workshop August 9-10, 2011. In this report, we provide highlights from the workshop. A central theme of the workshop was that preadolescence and adolescence are times of unique susceptibility and vulnerability within the lifespan. Participants discussed the evidence linking exposures during adolescence (e.g., risky behaviors, chemicals, medical imaging procedures) and subsequent cancer risk during adulthood. Participants also discussed potential opportunities to intervene on risk factors for cancer at multiple levels during adolescence, the importance of more focused approaches to adequately address health disparities, and the ongoing need for transdisciplinary and translational prevention research. Future opportunities for the CDC include further leveraging surveillance data from sources such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, and the National Children's Study and continuing to build on collaborations with other federal agencies and with national, state, and local organizations. Many ideas and insights generated during the workshop will be put into action as CDC continues to explore opportunities for cancer prevention during youth and across the lifespan.

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