Article

Minimal clinically important differences for the EQ-5D and QWB-SA in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): results from a Doubly Randomized Preference Trial (DRPT).

Health and Quality of Life Outcomes (Impact Factor: 2.1). 04/2013; 11(1):59. DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-11-59
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for the health-utility measures EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) and Quality of Well Being Self-Administered (QWB-SA) Scale in PTSD patients.Research design and methods: Two hundred patients aged 18 to 65 years with PTSD enrolled in a doubly randomized preference trial (DRPT) examining the treatment and treatment-preference effects between cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy with sertraline and completed the EQ-5D and QWB-SA at baseline and 10-week post-treatment. The anchor-based methods utilized a Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity. We regressed the changes in EQ-5D and QWB-SA scores on changes in the anchors using ordinary least squares regression. The slopes (beta coefficients) were the rates of change in the anchors as functions of change in EQ-5D and QWB, which represent our estimates of MCID. In addition, we performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to examine the relationship between the changes in EQ-5D and QWB-SA scores and treatment-response status. The MCIDs were estimated from the ROC curve where they best discriminate between treatment responders and non-responders. The distribution-based methods used small to moderate effect size in terms of 0.2 and 0.5 of standard deviation of the pre-treatment EQ-5D and QWB-SA scores.Clinical trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00127673. RESULTS: The anchor-based methods estimated the MCID ranges of 0.05 to 0.08 for the EQ-5D and 0.03 to 0.05 for the QWB. The MCID ranges were higher with the distribution-based methods, ranging from 0.04 to 0.10 for the EQ-5D and 0.02 to 0.05 for the QWB-SA. CONCLUSIONS: The established MCID ranges of EQ-5D and QWB-SA can be a useful tool in assessing meaningful changes in patient's quality of life for researchers and clinicians, and assisting health-policy makers to make informing decision in mental health treatment.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
165 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BackgroundA substantial minority of adolescents suffer from depression and it is associated with increased risk of suicide, social and educational impairment, and mental health problems in adulthood. A recently conducted randomized controlled trial in England evaluated the effectiveness of a manualized universally delivered age-appropriate CBT programme in school classrooms. The cost-effectiveness of the programme for preventing low mood and depression for all participants from a health and social care sector perspective needs to be determined.MethodsA trial-based cost-effectiveness analysis based on a cluster-randomized controlled trial (trial registration – ISRCTN 19083628) comparing classroom-based CBT with usual school provision of Personal Social and Health Education. Per-student cost of intervention was estimated from programme records. The study was undertaken in eight mixed-sex UK secondary schools, and included 3,357 school children aged 12 to 16 years (in the two trial arms evaluated in the cost-effectiveness analysis). The main outcome measures were individual self-reported data on care costs, Quality-Adjusted Life-Years (QALYs, based on the EQ-5D health-related quality-of-life instrument) and symptoms of depression (Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire) at baseline, 6 and 12 months.ResultsAlthough there was lower quality-adjusted life-years over 12 months (−.05 QALYs per person, 95% confidence interval −.09 to −.005, p = .03) with CBT, this is a ‘clinically’ negligible difference, which was not found in the complete case analyses. There was little evidence of any between-arm differences in SMFQ scores (0.19, 95% CI −0.57 to 0.95, p = .62), or costs (£142, 95% CI −£132 to £415, p = .31) per person for CBT versus usual school provision.Conclusions Our analysis suggests that the universal provision of classroom-based CBT is unlikely to be either more effective or less costly than usual school provision.
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 05/2014; · 5.42 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 01/2014; 10:1057-68. · 2.15 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) is the most common instrument to value health outcomes under the patient's perspective. Several studies have investigated whether observed changes are meaningful to patients, using a variety of approaches to estimate the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). This study provides an overview of the state of art of the estimation of the MCID for the three-level EQ-5D index based on the UK scoring algorithm, critically assessing the available evidence. The interest in estimation of MCID for the EQ-5D has been increasing in recent years. However, some additional standardization in the estimation procedures may be of value, in order to enhance the ability to make comparisons across measures and disease areas. Further methodological research might also contribute to reducing gaps between theory and practice.
    Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research 04/2014; 14(2):221-33. · 1.67 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
27 Downloads
Available from
May 29, 2014