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Manual for the Depression Anxiety, stress scales

Sydney
Publisher: Psychology Foundation
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    ABSTRACT: Attending university is a particularly stressful time due to unique emergent stressors such as changes in environment, loss or diminishment of social support networks, academic pressures, developing peer relationships, and financial management. There is growing recognition that these common stressors may have deleterious effects on the mental health of students. Resilience, a personality characteristic that moderates the negative effects of stress and promotes adaptation, has been associated with increased psychological well-being. Despite a growing body of research on resilience and its clinical significance in preventing mental health problems, relatively little is known about contributing factors for resilience in well-adjusted university students. This current study examined the characteristics of university students reporting high and low resilience for elucidating its clinical implications in preventing mental health problem, primarily focusing on potentially modifiable psychosocial variables. An international sample of 214 university students recruited from Australia, the United States of America, and Hong Kong universities completed measures of resilience, perceived social support, campus connectedness, and psychological dis-tress. Results of a one-way between groups multivariate analysis of variance revealed that per-ceived social support, campus connectedness, and psychological distress accounted for a signifi-cant proportion (36%) of the variance between the high and low resilience groups of university students. University students with low levels of resilience reported significantly lower levels of perceived social support, campus connectedness, and higher levels of psychological distress, in comparison to university students with high levels of resilience. Findings offer important implica-tions for the development of resilience-based interventions among university students.
    2nd Psychology and Health Conference; 11/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Extensive research shows university students experience high levels of stress, which can lead to the development of mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. Preliminary evidence supports the role of psychosocial factors such as perceived social support (PSS) and campus con-nectedness (CC) as protective factors in the development of mental health problems in university students. However, research conducted on the potential ameliorating effects of social support on stress applying Cohen and Wills' (1985) stress-buffering hypothesis produced weak, inconsistent, and even contradictory results. In addition, little attention has been given to examining the pro-tective role of CC in the relationships between perceived stress, anxiety, and depression. The cur-rent study examined the applicability of CC and PSS in buffering the relationships been perceived stress, anxiety, and depression across an international sample comprised of university students (N = 206) from Australia, Hong Kong, and the United States. The prediction that CC and PSS would moderate the relationships between perceived stress, anxiety, and depression was partially sup-ported. The results indicated CC moderated the relationship between perceived stress and de-pression but did not moderate the relationship between perceived stress and anxiety. PSS did not moderate the relationship between perceived stress and depression or the relationship between perceived stress and anxiety, thus rejecting the stress-buffering hypothesis. These findings sug-gest less emphasis should be placed on PSS as a protective factor, with universities focusing on enhancing CC to reduce the high prevalence of mental health problems to promote psychological wellbeing among students.
    2nd Psychology and Health Conference, Beijing, China; 11/2014
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effectiveness of a low vision self-management program (LVSMP) in older adults.Methods Participants(n = 153) were existing clients of a national low vision rehabilitation organisation randomly allocated to usual services (n = 60) or usual services plus LVSMP (n = 93). The LVSMP was an eight-week group program facilitated by low vision counsellors. The primary outcome was vision-specific quality of life (QoL) measured using the Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire. Secondary outcomes emotional well-being, self-efficacy and adaptation to vision loss were measured using the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), and Short Form Adaptation to Age-Related Vision Loss scale (AVL12).ResultsAt one and six month follow-up assessments, no significant between-group differences were found for vision-specific QoL, emotional well-being, adaptation to vision loss or self-efficacy (p > 0.05). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no impact of the intervention on outcome measures.Conclusions In contrast to previous work, our study found limited benefit of a LVSM program on QoL for older adults accessing low vision services.Practice ImplicationsWhen implementing self-management programs in low vision rehabilitation settings, issues of client interest, divergence of need, program accessibility and fidelity of intervention delivery need to be addressed.
    Patient Education and Counseling 11/2014; · 2.60 Impact Factor