Article

Effects of medially wedged foot orthoses on knee and hip joint running mechanics in females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.

La Crosse Institute for Movement Science, Department of Health Professions, Physical Therapy Program, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI.
Journal of applied biomechanics (Impact Factor: 1.26). 02/2013; 29(1):68-77.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examined the effects of medially wedged foot orthoses on knee and hip joint mechanics during running in females with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). We also tested if these effects depend on standing calcaneal eversion angle. Twenty female runners with and without PFPS participated. Knee and hip joint transverse and frontal plane peak angle, excursion, and peak internal knee and hip abduction moment were calculated while running with and without a 6° full-length medially wedged foot orthoses. Separate 3-factor mixed ANOVAs (group [PFPS, control] x condition [medial wedge, no medial wedge] x standing calcaneal angle [everted, neutral, inverted]) were used to test the effect of medially wedged orthoses on each dependent variable. Knee abduction moment increased 3% (P = .03) and hip adduction excursion decreased 0.6° (P < .01) using medially wedged foot orthoses. No significant group x condition or calcaneal angle x condition effects were observed. The addition of medially wedged foot orthoses to standardized running shoes had minimal effect on knee and hip joint mechanics during running thought to be associated with the etiology or exacerbation of PFPS symptoms. These effects did not appear to depend on injury status or standing calcaneal posture.

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    ABSTRACT: The patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a possible cause for anterior knee pain, which predominantly affects young female patients without any structural changes such as increased Q-angle or significant chondral damage. This literature review has shown that PFPS development is probably multifactorial with various functional disorders of the lower extremity. Biomechanical studies described patellar maltracking and dynamic valgus in PFPS patients (functional malalignment). Causes for the dynamic valgus may be decreased strength of the hip abductors or abnormal rear-foot eversion with pes pronatus valgus. PFPS is further associated with vastus medialis/vastus lateralis dysbalance, hamstring tightness or iliotibial tract tightness. The literature provides evidence for a multimodal non-operative therapy concept with short-term use of NSAIDs, short-term use of a medially directed tape and exercise programmes with the inclusion of the lower extremity, and hip and trunk muscles. There is also evidence for the use of patellar braces and foot orthosis. A randomized controlled trial has shown that arthroscopy is not the treatment of choice for treatment of PFPS without any structural changes. Patients with anterior knee pain have to be examined carefully with regard to functional causes for a PFPS. The treatment of PFPS patients is non-operative and should address the functional causes. Level of evidence V.
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