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How confident are we in the chronology of the transition between Howieson's Poort and Still Bay?

Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: .
Journal of Human Evolution (Impact Factor: 4.09). 04/2013; 64(4):314-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2013.01.006
Source: PubMed
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    Dataset: mishraplos
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