Disparities Between Black and White Children in Hospitalizations Associated With Acute Respiratory Illness and Laboratory-confirmed Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial Virus in 3 US Counties-2002-2009

American journal of epidemiology (Impact Factor: 5.23). 02/2013; 177(7). DOI: 10.1093/aje/kws299
Source: PubMed


Few US studies have assessed racial disparities in viral respiratory hospitalizations among children. This study enrolled black and white children under 5 years of age who were hospitalized for acute respiratory illness (ARI) in 3 US counties during October-May 2002-2009. Population-based rates of hospitalization were calculated by race for ARI and laboratory-confirmed influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), using US Census denominators. Relative rates of hospitalization between racial groups were estimated. Of 1,415 hospitalized black children and 1,824 hospitalized white children with ARI enrolled in the study, 108 (8%) black children and 111 (6%) white children had influenza and 230 (19%) black children and 441 (29%) white children had RSV. Hospitalization rates were higher among black children than among white children for ARI (relative rate (RR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6, 1.8) and influenza (RR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.6, 2.9). For RSV, rates were similar among black and white children under age 12 months but higher for black children aged 12 months or more (for ages 12-23 months, RR = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.5; for ages 24-59 months, RR = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.6). Black children versus white children were significantly more likely to have public insurance or no insurance (85% vs. 43%) and a history of asthma/wheezing (28% vs. 18%) but not more severe illness. The observed racial disparities require further study.

3 Reads
  • Source
    • "Neither child race nor ethnicity was associated with an increased risk for influenza hospitalization in our case-control study. Although racial disparities for hospitalization associated with acute respiratory illness including influenza have been reported,26,27 it is likely that other data we collected in our study, including household income and the presence of specific chronic medical conditions, accounted for any greater risk of influenza hospitalization among select racial/ethnic groups. For example, other studies have found that black children have higher asthma prevalence,28 black and Hispanic women have lower maternal age at first parity29 and blacks and Hispanics have highest US poverty rates.30 "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Young children are at increased risk of severe outcomes from influenza illness, including hospitalization. We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for influenza-associated hospitalizations among children in U.S. Emerging Infections Program sites. Cases were children 6-59 months of age hospitalized for laboratory-confirmed influenza infections during 2005-08. Age- and zip-code-matched controls were enrolled. Data on child, caregiver, and household characteristics were collected from parents and medical records. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for hospitalization. We enrolled 290 (64%) of 454 eligible cases and 1,089 (49%) of 2,204 eligible controls. Risk for influenza hospitalization increased with maternal age <26 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.9); household income below the poverty threshold (OR 2.2, CI 1.4-3.6); smoking by >50% of household members (OR 2.9, CI 1.4-6.6); lack of household influenza vaccination (OR 1.8, CI 1.2-2.5); and presence of chronic illnesses, including hematologic/oncologic (OR 11.8, CI 4.5-31.0), pulmonary (OR 2.9, CI 1.9-4.4), and neurologic (OR 3.8, CI 1.6-9.2) conditions. Full influenza immunization decreased the risk among children aged 6-23 months (OR 0.5, CI 0.3-0.9) but not among those 24-59 months of age (OR 1.5, CI 0.8-3.0; p-value for difference = 0.01). Chronic illnesses, young maternal age, poverty, household smoking, and lack of household influenza vaccination increased the risk of influenza hospitalization. These characteristics may help providers to identify young children who are at greatest risk for severe outcomes from influenza illness.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 03/2014; 33(6). DOI:10.1097/INF.0000000000000283 · 2.72 Impact Factor
  • American journal of epidemiology 06/2013; 178(1). DOI:10.1093/aje/kwt113 · 5.23 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of hospitalization among infants. However, estimates of the RSV hospitalization burden have varied, and precision has been limited by the use of age strata grouped in blocks of 6 to ≥12 months.METHODS:We analyzed data from a 5-year, prospective, population-based surveillance for young children who were hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI) during October through March 2000-2005. The total population at risk was stratified by month of age by birth certificate information to yield hospitalization rates.RESULTS:There were 559 (26%) RSV-infected children among the 2149 enrolled children hospitalized with ARI (85% of all eligible children with ARI). The average RSV hospitalization rate was 5.2 per 1000 children <24 months old. The highest age-specific rate was in infants 1 month old (25.9 per 1000 children). Infants ≤2 months of age, who comprised 44% of RSV-hospitalized children, had a hospitalization rate of 17.9 per 1000 children. Most children (79%) were previously healthy. Very preterm infants (<30 weeks' gestation) accounted for only 3% of RSV cases but had RSV hospitalization rates 3 times that of term infants.CONCLUSIONS:Young infants, especially those who were 1 month old, were at greatest risk of RSV hospitalization. Four-fifths of RSV-hospitalized infants were previously healthy. To substantially reduce the burden of RSV hospitalizations, effective general preventive strategies will be required for all young infants, not just those with risk factors.
    PEDIATRICS 07/2013; 132(2). DOI:10.1542/peds.2013-0303 · 5.47 Impact Factor
Show more