Article

Therapists Perspectives on the Effective Elements of Consultation Following Training.

Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market Street, 3015, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA, .
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research (Impact Factor: 3.44). 02/2013; 40(6). DOI: 10.1007/s10488-013-0475-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Consultation is an effective implementation strategy to improve uptake of evidence-based practices for youth. However, little is known about what makes consultation effective. The present study used qualitative methods to explore therapists perspectives about consultation. We interviewed 50 therapists who had been trained 2 years prior in cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety. Three themes emerged regarding effective elements of consultation: (1) connectedness with other therapists and the consultant, (2) authentic interactions around actual cases, and (3) the responsiveness of the consultant to the needs of individual therapists. Recommendations for the design of future consultation endeavors are offered.

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May 20, 2014