Gynostemma pentaphyllum Tea Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Endocrine and Diabetes Unit, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, SE 17176 Stockholm, Sweden
Journal of nutrition and metabolism 01/2013; 2013(3):765383. DOI: 10.1155/2013/765383
Source: PubMed


Aims. To evaluate the effect of the traditional Vietnamese herb Gynostemma pentaphyllum tea on insulin sensitivity in drug-naïve type 2 diabetic patients. Methods. Patients received GP or placebo tea 6 g daily for four weeks and vice versa with a 2-week wash-out period. At the end of each period, a somatostatin-insulin-glucose infusion test (SIGIT) was performed to evaluate the insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA(1C), and oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin levels were measured before, during, and after the treatment. Results. FPG and steady-state plasma glucose (SIGIT mean) were lower after GP treatment compared to placebo treatment (P < 0.001). The levels of FPG in the control group were slightly reduced to 0.2 ± 1.5 versus 1.9 ± 1.0 mmol/L in GP group (P < 0.001), and the effect on FPG was reversed after exchanging treatments. The glycometabolic improvements were achieved without any major change of circulating insulin levels. There were no changes in lipids, body measurements, blood pressure, and no reported hypoglycemias or acute adverse effects regarding kidney and liver parameters. Conclusion. The results of this study suggested that the GP tea exerted antidiabetic effect by improving insulin sensitivity.

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Available from: Hoa K Nguyen, May 21, 2014
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    • "The antidiabetic effects of GP have been clearly demonstrated in animal models of diabetes and randomly assigned type 2 diabetic patients. Thus, administration of GP tea in diabetic patients improves glucose tolerance by enhancing insulin sensitivity [12] [13] [14]. A similar effect was observed in the Goto-Kakizaki rat, an animal model of type 2 diabetes, showing that GP extract reduces the hepatic glucose output [15]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Aims. To evaluate the antidiabetic effects of Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, an animal model of type 2 diabetes, and to investigate the mechanisms of insulin release. Methods. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and plasma insulin levels were measured. Results. An oral treatment with GP (0.3 g/kg of body weight daily) for two weeks in GK rats improved glucose tolerance versus placebo group (P < 0.01). Plasma insulin levels were significantly increased in the GP-treated group. The insulin release from GP-treated GK rats was 1.9-fold higher as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). GP stimulated insulin release in isolated GK rat islets at high glucose. Opening of ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channels by diazoxide and inhibition of calcium channels by nifedipine significantly decreased insulin response to GP. Furthermore, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89 decreased the insulin response to GP (P < 0.05). In addition, GP-induced insulin secretion was decreased after preincubation of GK islets with pertussis toxin to inhibit exocytotic Ge proteins (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The antidiabetic effect of GP is associated with the stimulation of insulin release from the islets. GP-induced insulin release is partly mediated via K-ATP and L-type Ca(2+) channels, the PKA system and also dependent on pertussis toxin sensitive Ge-protein.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 07/2015; 2015(2):120572. DOI:10.1155/2015/120572 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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