Article

Anaerobic performance testing of professional soccer players 1995-2010.

Norwegian Olympic Federation, Oslo, Norway.
International journal of sports physiology and performance (Impact Factor: 2.68). 03/2013; 8(2):148-56.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare sprint and countermovement-jump (CMJ) performance among competitive soccer players as a function of performance level, field position, and age. In addition, the authors wanted to quantify the evolution of these physical characteristics among professional players over a 15-y period. Methods: 939 athletes (22.1 ± 4.3 y), including national-team players, tested 40-m sprint with electronic timing and CMJ on a force platform at the Norwegian Olympic Training Center between 1995 and 2010. Results: National-team and 1st-division players were faster (P < .05) than 2nd-division (1.0-1.4%), 3rd- to 5th-division (3.0-3.8%), junior national-team (1.7-2.2%), and junior players (2.8-3.7%). Forwards were faster than defenders (1.4%), midfielders (2.5%), and goalkeepers (3.2%) over 0-20 m (P < .001). Midfielders jumped ~2.0 cm lower than the other playing positions (P < .05). Sprinting velocity peaked in the age range 20-28 y and declined significantly thereafter (P < .05). Players from 2006-2010 had 1-2% faster 0-20 m and peak velocity than players from the 1995-1999 and 2000-2005 epochs, whereas no differences in CMJ performance were observed. Conclusions: This study provides effect-magnitude estimates for the influence of performance level, position, and age on sprint and CMJ performance in soccer. While CMJ performance has remained stable over the time, there has been a small but positive development in sprinting velocity among professional players.

3 Bookmarks
 · 
457 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to compare a level of tapping frequency of lower limbs of elite Slovak soccer players at different playing positions (n = 48, age = 23.8 ± 4.9 years, height = 181.4 ± 6.9 cm, weight = 77.8 ± 7.2 kg; goalkeepers = 5, age = 25.9 ± 3.5 years, height = 190.4 ± 2.2 cm, weight = 85.6 ± 3.4 kg; defenders = 15, age = 25.4 ± 5.2 years, height = 181.2 ± 5.0 cm, weight = 78.0 ± 6.5 kg; midfielders = 19, age = 21.7 ± 3.7 years, height = 177.5 ± 6.3 cm, weight = 73.5 ± 5.9 kg; forwards = 9, age = 24.3 ± 4.5 years, height = 185.2 ± 6.6 cm, weight = 81.9 ± 6.7 kg). The level of tapping frequency of lower limbs was diagnosed with the device FiTROtapping, (FiTRONIC, Bratislava, Slovak Republic). The criterion of performance evaluation of every measured soccer player was total number of contacts with both legs on contact mats of mentioned device during 6 seconds in a standing position. One-way ANOVA was used for determination of difference significance (α = 0.05) between playing positions. The statistical analysis was realized by software IBM® SPSS® Statistics V19. The highest average level of tapping frequency of lower limbs in 6 seconds was observed by forwards (59.9 ± 5.9 contacts), then by defenders (58.5 ± 5.5 contacts), by midfielders (58.1 ± 6.8 contacts). The lowest average level of tapping frequency of lower limbs had goalkeepers (53.2±3.3 contacts). The statistical analysis did not show any significant differences between playing groups (F (3.44) =1.405, p>0.05, η 2 = 0.09).
    Acta Kinesiologica. 12/2014; 8(2):35-39.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT To compare the effects of repeated agility training along with repeated sprint training on elite female soccer players' linear single sprint speed, vertical jump, agility, repeated sprint ability and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 1 test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. Seventeen elite female soccer players aged 21.2 ± 2.6 years from the upper Norwegian league were randomised into one of two groups: a repeated agility group and a repeated sprint group. During the intervention period, both groups performed one extra weekly training session in addition to their regular soccer training. The study took place in the pre-season period and lasted for 8 weeks. The participants were tested before and after the intervention period. The results from the within-group analysis showed significant improvements in 10 × 40 m RSA, agility, and Yo-Yo IR1 performances for the agility group. The repeated sprint group showed significant improvements in 10 × 40 m RSA, 20 m top speed, 40 m linear sprint, CMJ vertical jump, and Yo-Yo IR1. The between-groups comparison revealed no significant differences between groups in any of the measured variables. Further, the results indicate that the both training programmes had a similar effect on both groups. The present study adds further support to the notion that common principles of training such as specificity, progression and periodisation are clearly present in the sprint training of soccer players.
    Kinesiology 01/2013; 19(3):29-42. · 0.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a 12 week speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training program on speed and flexibility in young soccer players. One hundred and thirtytwo soccer players were randomly assigned to experimental (EG ; n = 66, mean ± SD: age: 18.5 ± 0.4 years (range 17–19 years) ; body mass: 71.30 ± 5.93 kg ; stature: 177.2 ± 6.5 cm) and control groups (CG ; n = 66, mean ± SD: age: 18.6 ± 0.6 years (range 17–19 years) ; body mass: 70.63 ± 4.87 kg ; stature: 175.9 ± 5.7 cm). The experimental group performed SAQ training whilst the control group undertook straight-line sprint training matched for volume and duration. Sprint performance was assessed using 5 and 10 m sprints and a further test including maximal speed, a 20 m sprint. Flexibility was assessed using sit and reach, V-sit and reach, leg lift from supine position and lateral leg lift while lying on the side tests. Sprints over 5, 10 and 20 m did not differ between groups at baseline, but by week 12, the 5 m sprint had significantly improved (P < .05) in the SAQ training group compared to the control group (1.40 ± 0.13 vs. 1.46 ± 0.12 s, respectively) although this improvement had a trivial effect size (ES = 0.15). The 10 m sprint time had improved by 3.3% (P < .01) in the SAQ group with a moderate effect size (ES = 0.66).
    Human Movement Science 01/2014; 2014(38):197-208. · 2.03 Impact Factor

Full-text (3 Sources)

Download
432 Downloads
Available from
Jun 3, 2014