Article

Kids are not small adults; however, both can be challenging*.

Department of AnesthesiologyWake Forest School of MedicineWinston Salem, NC.
Critical care medicine (Impact Factor: 6.15). 03/2013; 41(3):932-3. DOI: 10.1097/CCM.0b013e31827bfc50
Source: PubMed
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