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FDA warning: Driving may be impaired the morning following sleeping pill use.

JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 02/2013; 309(7):645-6. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.323
Source: PubMed
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