Article

Glucocerebrosidase in the pathogenesis and treatment of Parkinson disease.

Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University College London Institute of Neurology, London NW3 2PF, United Kingdom.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 02/2013; 110(9):3214-5. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1300822110
Source: PubMed
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