Article

Neighbourhood socioeconomic inequalities in food access and affordability.

Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood VIC 3125, Australia.
Health & Place (Impact Factor: 2.44). 11/2008; 15(2):578-85. DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2008.09.010
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study investigated whether the availability and accessibility of supermarkets and fruit and vegetable stores, and the availability, variety and price of foods within these stores, varied across areas of different levels of socioeconomic disadvantage in Melbourne, Australia. Data on food store locations, and food variety and price within stores were obtained through objective audits of 45 neighbourhoods of varying socioeconomic disadvantage. Geographical accessibility of healthy food stores was mostly better amongst those living in more advantaged neighbourhoods. Availability of healthy foods within stores only slightly favoured those in advantaged neighbourhoods. However food prices favoured those living in disadvantaged areas.

1 Bookmark
 · 
107 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Food is a major contributor to the Tasmanian economy. However, due to a higher level of socioeconomic disadvantage, compared to other states of Australia, food insecurity is likely to be experienced by proportionately more people. Whilst there have been efforts made to address the causes of food insecurity in Tasmania such as the establishment of the Tasmanian Food Security Council and the implementation of the Tasmanian Food and Nutrition Policy (2004), there is currently a scarcity of data on food security in Tasmania. The aim of the Tasmanian Food Access Research Coalition (TFARC) is to identify and improve understanding of food access in two very different local government areas in Tasmania, including a peri-urban and rural-remote area. TFARC will develop a standardised methodology to collect data on food access which includes 1) a market basket survey containing a list of food items representing what a typical household would eat over a 2 week period; 2) a food outlet audit tool which identifies categories of food outlets which can then be mapped using a geographical information system; 3) a household food security survey and 4) a bank of questions for community focus groups. The findings will inform both the development of the Tasmanian food security strategy and community responses to food security challenges. The research outcomes of the TFARC project are relevant to Nutrition and Dietetic professionals practicing in rural-remote and peri-urban settings by contributing to the evidence-based available to support local government and regional food security initiatives.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to propose an elective social work course as a means of better preparing social workers entering practice in healthcare to meet the challenges of promoting health and reducing health disparities in minority and underserved communities. Course offerings specifically targeting health or medical social work training vary widely. The additional training provided at places of employment and through continuing education after the master's degree is often inadequate for competently addressing the issues clinicians face in practice.
    Journal of Teaching in Social Work 11/2012; 32(5):471-486.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Food is a major contributor to the Tasmanian economy. However, due to a higher level of socioeconomic disadvantage, compared to other states of Australia, food insecurity is likely to be experienced by proportionately more people. Whilst there have been efforts made to address the causes of food insecurity in Tasmania such as the establishment of the Tasmanian Food Security Council and the implementation of the Tasmanian Food and Nutrition Policy (2004), there is currently a scarcity of existing data on food security in Tasmania. The aim of the Tasmanian Food Access Research Coalition (TFARC) was to identify and improve understanding of food access in two very different local government areas in Tasmania, including a peri-urban and rural-remote area, through the application of a community development framework. TFARC developed a standardised methodology to collect data on food access to assess food availability, affordability, quality and awareness. This data has provided a better understanding of the determinants of food security in Tasmania by considering why people experience food insecurity, and the barriers and enablers to food security. This data in-turn was intended to inform the development of the Tasmanian food security strategy framework. The outcomes will contribute to the evidence base available to support local government and regional food security initiatives by identifying gaps in services and recognise future opportunities.

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
586 Downloads
Available from
May 30, 2014