Article

Cost-effectiveness analysis of behavioral interventions to improve vaccination compliance in homeless adults.

University of California, Los Angeles, School of Nursing, Box 956917, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6917, USA.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.49). 12/2008; 27(5):718-25. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.11.031
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To estimate the cost-effectiveness of three behavioral interventions provided to enhance hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) joint vaccination (HAV/HBV) compliance among homeless persons living in Los Angeles County.
A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from a randomized trial where the costs and compliance data from the trial are incorporated into two Markov models, simulating the natural history of acute and chronic hepatitis infection, following HAV/HBV vaccination.
Reductions in HBV-related disease is cost-effective to society and is associated with substantial improvements in quality of life.

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