Article

The child behavior checklist dysregulation profile predicts adolescent DSM-5 pathological personality traits 4 years later.

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium, .
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 3.55). 02/2013; DOI: 10.1007/s00787-013-0379-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Emotional dysregulation in childhood has been associated with various forms of later psychopathology, although no studies have investigated the personality related adolescent outcomes associated with early emotional dysregulation. The present study uses a typological approach to examine how the child behavior checklist-dysregulation profile (CBCL-DP) predicts DSM-5 pathological personality traits (as measured with the personality inventory for the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders 5 or PID-5 by Krueger et al. (Psychol Med 2012)) across a time span of 4 years in a sample of 243 children aged 8-14 years (57.2 % girls). The results showed that children assigned to the CBCL-DP class are at risk for elevated scores on a wide range of DSM-5 personality pathology features, including higher scores on hostility, risk taking, deceitfulness, callousness, grandiosity, irresponsibility, impulsivity and manipulativeness. These results are discussed in the context of identifying early manifestations of persistent regulation problems, because of their enduring impact on a child's personality development.

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