Article

Neuroinflammation and the dynamic lesion in traumatic brain injury.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Centre, 1001 SWKT, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA. .
Brain (Impact Factor: 10.23). 01/2013; 136(Pt 1):9-11. DOI: 10.1093/brain/aws342
Source: PubMed
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