Article

Assessment of the influence of one's education on early diagnosis of multiple primary cancer in patients with uveal melanoma.

Department of Ophthalmology, Clinic of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Kraków, Poland.
Klinika oczna 01/2012; 114(2):111-4.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This study will show a comparison of two groups of patients with uveal melanoma; one group with multiple primary cancer, and a second group with no identifiable second cancer, in terms of education and occupation.
Study concerns 240 patients, who were isolated from patients being treated with uveal melanoma at the Department of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology Jagiellonian University Medical College in the period from 1998 to 2007. On the basis of medical history and medical records 97 patients were diagnosed with the one or more independent primary cancers. These patients were subjected to comparative analysis with a group of 143 patients with uveal melanoma as a control group.
Analyzing the impact of education on the recognition of multiple primary cancer, there were significantly more frequent diagnoses of second primary cancers among patients with secondary and higher education than among those who had primary and vocational education. Among the obtained data on patients in the study group, the largest occupational group (according to the ISCO-88 (COM)) constituted "professionals". In the control group prevailed "craft and related trades workers".
The results suggest the great importance of knowledge about risk factors for the development of cancer among patients with uveal melanoma and the ensuing more scrupulous search for succesive primary neoplasm and indicate the neccesity of organizing broad prophylactic actions. uveal melanoma, multiple primary cancer.

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    ABSTRACT: To find differences between a group of patients with intraocular melanoma and another primary cancer and a group of patients with no identifiable second primary cancer. The analysis involved 240 participants, selected from patients who were treated for uveal melanoma at the Department of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology of the Jagiellonian University Medical College between the year 1998 and 2007. Among those patients 97 were diagnosed with one or more independent primary cancers. Those patients were subject to a comparative analysis with a second group of 143 patients who had uveal melanoma with no identifiable second primary cancer. STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE GROUP OF PATIENTS WITH INTRAOCULAR MELANOMA AND ANOTHER PRIMARY CANCER, AND THE GROUP OF PATIENTS WITH UVEAL MELANOMA (BUT WITHOUT ANOTHER DIAGNOSED PRIMARY NEOPLASM) WERE AS FOLLOWS: more common family history of cancer, better education, living in cities (especially with a population over 500 thousand), previous surgery except for uveal melanoma, and two or less than two pregnancies in the case of women. This analysis revealed that more common family history of cancer, better education, living in cities (especially with a population over 500 thousand), previous surgery, except for uveal melanoma, and two or less than two pregnancies in the case of women, were associated with a higher rate of detection of multiple primary cancers.
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