Article

The Myers-Briggs type indicator and transformational leadership

Journal of Management Development (Impact Factor: 0.32). 10/2009; 28(10):916-932. DOI: 10.1108/02621710911000677

ABSTRACT Purpose – This paper aims to study the possible relationship between elements of personality as measured by the Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI) and transformational leadership (TL) as measured by the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ). Design/methodology/approach – The study was done at the North American manufacturing facility of an international technology company. Utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire to measure transformational leadership, over 2,000 followers provided assessments of transformational leadership for 148 managers who had done self-assessments and had completed Form K of the MBTI. Findings – No relationship was found between follower assessments of transformational leadership and leader personality as measured by the MBTI. Leaders did, however, perceive themselves to be significantly more transformational than did those who reported to them. Leader preference for extraversion over introversion and intuition over perception were both significantly associated with self-reports of transformational leadership. Research limitations/implications – Studies utilizing large samples across a variety of organizational settings are needed to confirm the results of this study. Practical implications – This study calls into question the existence of a relationship between the MBTI and transformational leadership. The study does not provide any support for the possible utility of the MBTI for the prediction or explanation of transformational leadership behaviors. Assuming that followers' perceptions of TL are the more valid, the findings suggest that previous results linking MBTI and TL may be measurement artifacts. Originality/value – Utilizing a large sample, the MLQ and continuous measures of MBTI preferences the results of this study contradict previous reports of a relationship between personality as measured by the MBTI and transformational leadership.

8 Followers
 · 
485 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a study to test the notion that transformational leadership style is more effective than transactional leadership style by fostering employee well-being (enhancing quality of work life and life satisfaction as well as increasing organizational commitment and decreasing employee burnout. We surveyed 443 employees at 5-star hotels in Turkey. The results provide support for the positive effect of transformational leadership in the hospitality industry, which implies that hospitality managers should be trained to use a transformational leadership style to enhance employee well-being.
    International Journal of Hospitality Management 09/2013; 34:9–18. DOI:10.1016/j.ijhm.2013.02.001 · 1.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current research sought to determine the effect that flow—a state of optimal experience—has on the relationships between positive leadership and employee attitudes and perceptions of safety climate. Regression analyses revealed that flow moderated the effects of transformational leadership on job satisfaction and the effects of authentic leadership on both job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, flow and positive leadership interacted in such a way as to negatively predict employee attitudes. Additionally, flow partially mediated the effect of authentic leadership on safety climate. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical importance of these findings and the potential limitations of the current study.
    The Psychologist-Manager Journal 01/2012; 15(3):174-198. DOI:10.1080/10887156.2012.701129
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Calls for the inclusion of levels of analysis in theory building and testing have increased over the last 25 years. Through analysis of 539 published articles we assess the prevalence of incorporation of levels of analysis in theory/hypothesis formulation, measurement, data analysis, and subsequent theory–data alignment (i.e., article quality) within charismatic and transformational leadership research. Additionally, we examine the relationship between incorporation of levels of analysis into research and publication source quality, as reflected by journal impact factors or when not available, estimated journal impact factors. When controlling for the level of analysis within all articles, results revealed that increasing the complexity of the level of analysis (i.e., higher than individual level), increased the likelihood that measurement, analysis and alignment of theory and data would be presented at the appropriate levels of analysis. In contrast, for articles with published impact factors, when controlling for the level of analysis, results revealed that increasing the complexity of the level of analysis (i.e., higher than individual level) decreased the likelihood that measurement, analysis and alignment of theory and data would be presented at the appropriate levels of analysis.
    The Leadership Quarterly 12/2012; 23(6):1012-1042. DOI:10.1016/j.leaqua.2012.10.003 · 2.70 Impact Factor
Show more